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Correction/test OIB

Cours gratuits > Forum > Forum anglais: Questions sur l'anglais || En bas

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Correction/test OIB
Message de glishfudge posté le 20-03-2016 à 12:24:28 (S | E | F)
Bonjour à tous,
Mercredi 23/03, j'ai mon test écrit d'entrée pour la section OIB britannique. J'ai donc travaillé sur une annale de ce test pour m'entraîner. Pourriez-vous me donner des conseils et me dire ce qui va/ne va pas?
Merci d'avance pour vos réponses.

Voici le texte sur lequel portent les questions qui suivent.
Games at Twilight / Anita Desai
It was still too hot to play outdoors. They had had their tea, they had been washed and had their hair brushed, and after the long day of confinement in the house that was not cool but at least a protection from the sun, the children strained to get out. Their faces were red and bloated with the effort, but their mother would not open the door, everything was still curtained and shuttered in a way that stifled the children, made them feel that their lungs were stuffed with cotton wool and their noses with dust and if they didn’t burst out into the light and see the sun and feel the air, they would choke.
‘Please ma, please,’ they begged. ‘We’ll play in the veranda and porch- we won’t go a step out of the porch.’
‘You will, I know you will and then-‘
‘No- we won’t, we won’t,’ they wailed so horrendously that she actually let down the bolt of the front door so that they burst out like seeds from a crackling overripe pod into the veranda, with such wild maniacal yells that she retreated to her bath and the shower of talcum powder and the fresh sari that were to help her face the summer evening.

They faced the afternoon. It was too hot. Too bright. The white walls of the veranda glared stridently in the sun. The bougainvillea hung about it, purple and magenta, in livid balloons. The garden outside was like a tray made of beaten brass, flattened out on the red gravel and the stony soil in all shades of metal- aluminium, tin, copper and brass. No life stirred at this arid time of day- the birds still drooped, like dead fruit, in the papery tents of the trees; some squirrels lay limp on the wet earth under the garden tap. The outdoor dog lay stretched as if dead on the veranda mat, his paws and ears and tail all reaching out like dying travellers in search of water. He rolled his eyes at the children- two white marbles rolling in the purple sockets, begging for sympathy- and attempted to lift his tail in a wag but could not. It only twitched and lay still.

Then perhaps roused by the shrieks of the children, a band of parrots suddenly fell out of the eucalyptus tree, tumbled frantically in the still sizzling air, then sorted themselves out into battle formation and streaked away across the white sky.
The children too felt released. They too began tumbling, shoving, pushing against each other, frantic to start. Start what? Start their business. The business of the children’s day which is- play.
‘Let’s play hide-and-seek.’*
‘Who’ll be It?’
‘You be It.’
‘Why should I? You be-’
‘You’re the oldest.’
‘That doesn’t mean-’
The shoves became harder. Some kicked out. The motherly Mira intervened. She pulled the boys roughly apart.
‘Make a circle, make a circle!’ she shouted, firmly pulling and pushing till a kind of vague circle was formed.

Raghu was It. He started to protest, to cry ‘You cheated-Mira cheated-Manu cheated-‘ but it was too late, the others had already streaked away. There was no one to hear when he called out, ‘Only the veranda- the porch-Ma said- Ma said to stay in the porch.’ Only small Manu suddenly reappeared, as if he had dropped out of an invisible cloud or from a bird’s claws, and stood for a moment in the centre of the yellow lawn, chewing his finger and near to tears as he heard Raghu shouting with his head pressed against the veranda wall, ‘Eighty-three, eighty-five, eighty nine,’ and then made off in a panic. Raghu charged after him with such a blood-curdling yell that Manu stumbled over the hosepipe, fell into its rubber coils and lay there weeping, ‘I won’t be It- you have to find them all-all-All!’
‘I know I have to, idiot, Raghu said superciliously kicking him with his toe. ‘You’re dead,’ he said, with satisfaction, licking the beads of perspiration off his upper lip, and then stalked off in search of worthier prey.

* hide-and-seek is a game where one player called It has to find the others who are hiding. It is the same as cache-cache

PARTIE A : TEXTE/QUESTIONS
1. In which country do you think this story is set? Give the reasons for your answer. (5)
2. Why does the mother keep her children in the house? (3)
3. Why does she eventually let them out to play? (3)
4. What does she do when they go outside? (3)
5. Give examples of how the heat affects the birds and animals in the story. (5)
6. Compare the children’s feelings and behaviour inside the house with their feelings and behaviour outside of the house. (5)
7. How do the children organise themselves for the game? (5)
8. How can you tell that Manu is upset and frightened? (4)
9. What does Raghu think about Manu and how can you tell? (4)
10. Like seeds from a crackling overripe pod.. The garden outside was like a tray made of beaten brass…the birds still drooped like dead fruit….The outdoor dog lay stretched as if dead…like dying travellers in search of water….as if he had dropped out of an invisible cloud.. In her story Anita Desai uses many comparisons to help her describe the scene. Which is your favourite comparison and why? (3)

1. I think this story is set in India because the mother wears a sari, wich is a typical Indian piece of clothing : « the fresh sari that were to help her face this summer evening ». The weather in India can be extremely hot, especially in the summer : in the text, it seems to be the case. « It was still too hot to play outdoors » ; « It was too hot »,... In the garden, there are animals, such as parrots and squirrels, that can be found in India but certainly not in Europe : « some squirrels lay limp on the wet earth under the garden tap » ; « a band of parrots suddently fell out of the eucalyptus tree ». Finally, the children in the story have Indian names : « Raghu » and « Manu ».

2. The mother keeps her children in the house because, especially in the afternoon, it is too hot to play outside and the sun is too bright, so she doesn't wants them to get sunbrun or to be ill because of the heat.

3. She eventually lets them out to play because the children want to feel the air and the sun, they feel like they're choking when they are inside of the house, so she lets them play in the veranda and porch.

4. When they go outside, she takes a bath, a shower of talcum powder and puts on a fresh sari to relax and try to handle the heat better.

5. The heat affects multiple animals in the story : the birds droop in the tents that the trees forme ; « the birds still drooped, like dead fruits, in the papery tent of the trees », the squirrels lay in the wet earth to get some freshness « some squirrels lay limp on the wet earth under the garden tap », the dog can't do anything exept for lying down and not moving : « the outdoor dog lay stretched as if dead on the veranda mat » ; « attempted to ift his tail in a wag but could not »

6. Inside the house, the children are bored and they strain to get out and finally lay after a long day inside the house. They are calmer and they behave well so their mother lets them out to play. Once they are outside, they are very exited to play, they push each other, they seem really happy to finally be out and they aren't calm anymore.

7. After they fought to choose who should be It, Mira intervens and tells them to make a circle. Raghu is chosen to be It, he counts while the other children hide but they cheat because they hide outside when they are supposed to stay in the veranda.

8. We can tell that small Manu is upset and frightened because he is chewing his fingers and he is about to cry. When Raghu charges him, he panics.

9. Raghu doesn't really like Manu and he likes to scare him because he is the smallest. We can tell because he is being mean to him, he makes Manu fall, he calls him an idiot and he even threatens him by saying « you're dead ».

10. My favourite comparison is « like dying travellers in search of water » because it references to his paws, ears and tail reaching out but also to the heat, she compares the heat in India to the desert's heat, where travellers would struggle to fin water. I like that there is actually two comparisons in one.

-------------------
Modifié par lucile83 le 20-03-2016 13:41
Aux correcteurs, pas de panique; c'est long mais j'ai regroupé 2 messages en 1 pour que la correction soit plus facile.


Réponse: Correction/test OIB de gerondif, postée le 21-03-2016 à 15:35:10 (S | E)
Bonjour,
erreurs en bleu, corrections en vert

1. I think this story is set in India because the mother wears (is wearing) a sari, wich is a typical Indian piece of clothing : « the fresh sari that were to help her face this summer evening ». The weather in India can be extremely hot, especially in the summer : in the text, it seems to be the case. « It was still too hot to play outdoors » ; « It was too hot »,... In the garden, there are animals, such as parrots and squirrels, that can be found in India but certainly not in Europe : « some squirrels lay limp on the wet earth under the garden tap » ; « a band of parrots suddently fell out of the eucalyptus tree ». Finally, the children in the story have Indian names : « Raghu » and « Manu ».

2. The mother keeps her children in the house because, especially in the afternoon, it is too hot to play outside and the sun is too bright, so she doesn't wants them to get sunbrun or to be ill because of the heat.

3. She eventually lets them out to play because the children want to feel the air and the sun, they feel like they're choking when they are inside of the house, so she lets them play in the veranda and porch.

4. When they go outside, she takes a bath, a shower of talcum powder and puts on a fresh sari to relax and try to handle the heat better.

5. The heat affects multiple animals in the story : the birds droop in the tents that the trees forme ; « the birds still drooped, like dead fruits, in the papery tent of the trees », the squirrels lay in the wet earth to get some freshness « some squirrels lay limp on the wet earth under the garden tap », the dog can't do anything exept for lying down and not moving : « the outdoor dog lay stretched as if dead on the veranda mat » ; « attempted to ift his tail in a wag but could not »

6. Inside the house, the children are bored and they strain to get out and finally lay after a long day inside the house. They are calmer and they behave well so their mother lets them out to play. Once they are outside, they are very exited(excited) to play, they push each other, they seem really happy to finally be out and they aren't calm anymore.

7. After they fought to choose who should be It, Mira intervens and tells them to make a circle. Raghu is chosen to be It, he counts while the other children hide but they cheat because they hide outside when (whereas) they are supposed to stay in the veranda.

8. We can tell that small Manu is upset and frightened because he is chewing his fingers and he is about to cry. When Raghu charges him, he panics.

9. Raghu doesn't really like Manu and he likes to scare him because he is the smallest. We can tell because he is being mean to him, he makes Manu fall, he calls him an idiot and he even threatens him by saying « you're dead ».

10. My favourite comparison is « like dying travellers in search of water » because it references to his paws, ears and tail reaching out but also to the heat, she compares the heat in India to the desert's heat (un nom composé irait aussi), where travellers would struggle to fin water. I like that there is(pluriel) actually two comparisons in one.




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