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Oral/Children literature

Cours gratuits > Forum > Forum anglais: Questions sur l'anglais || En bas

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Oral/Children literature
Message de macarena posté le 10-06-2015 à 14:56:52 (S | E | F)
Hello!
Could you help me with my oral preparation for the BAC, please? I will not recite it by heart of course, but I need it for help me to not exceed the alloted time (which is very short). Thanks you in advance!

Humour and nonsense in children's literature
The filde under study belongs to the theme of Imaginary World. Litterature is a good place for imagination, words imply you have to visualize by yourself what is written on the paper. And it is wonderful because, each person has not the same image of the others. Descriptions and plot lead you but after that, you are on your own, this is your experience.
I will talk you about a specific genre called non sense.
Nonsense is not a complete gibberish, nor a parody or a satire, but a true and distinct art form which can be found in nursery rhymes and children literature.
The individual words make sense and are arranged according to proper grammatical rules, however the result is nonsense. It can have no real meaning for a logical mind, sometimes it's totaly absurd or inapprehensible, but it also what it give all its char to this form of literature.

It appeals to children because in their education we teach them to comprehend the world in a very logical and down-to-earth way, but at the same time, they are still in a period of innocence, conducive to daydream. They play, they explore, they imagine wonderful stories, wonderful places, inspired by the stories they heard.
So because, they are on the limits between a very coherent world and a magic universe, they are best placed to grasp this kind of humour and enjoy it. My problematic is the following one : How humour & non sense in children litterature can be read at different levels?

Let me introduce you my first document about it. It is Alice trought the looking glass by Lewis Caroll.
In this story Alice, a young girl, meets several characters, and there is a opposition between their nonsense and Alice's obstinated good sense/ it is what creates humour in the book.
The episode with the White Knight illustrates that very well. With all his inventions, totaly useless, uncommon or even dangerous (like the bee-hive on the horse back), the white knight is silly (alsmot like a clown) and it is quite funny to children. Children readers identify Alice's logic but they also accept and love eccentric characters such as the White Knight.
So, Alice's adventures were written in 1865, so the middle of the 19th century. But there is an other classic of the children literature, dating 1876. It is the Tom Sawyer's Adventures. So Alice was from the brithish literature, a product from the Victorian Era, but the book of Mark Twain reflects Southwestern American humour. Tom's childhood in Hannibal was all about games, streamboats, the Big Muddy and building huts in the forests in the surroungings.
To my mind, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer targeted readers a little bit older. First because Alice is still a child, and Tom is a young teenager or a “preteen” he is 12 or 13.
But moreover the tone and the humour in Tom Sawyer is very different., it's more a social satire and Tom's tricks have an adult side, because it's based american culture of capitalism. → go up to social ladder, use the corruption etc...
In Tom Sawyer the humour is based on Tom's tricks, the way he manipulates everyone, his friends (the episode of the white hence) and even adults thanks to his intelligence. He's as sly as a fox, a good actor, but he is a child so it's acceptable.

You discover that all the things who made you laught have in fact an implicit message, and a very symbolic impact. That's why children literature never really aged and can be appreciated by everyone. Humour and nonsense processes can make you laught when you're young, and make you reflect when you're older.

Over the years, people have always attempted to explain the symbolic of Alice's story and this curious place named Wonderland.
My last document is quite revealing of this tendency to link society's concerns with a tale for children.
It is an article from The Telegraph, written by Rosa Silverman in January 2015 on the occasion of Alice in Wonderland's 150th anniversary.

-------------------
Edited by lucile83 on 10-06-2015 15:10



Réponse: Oral/Children literature de bluestar, postée le 11-06-2015 à 15:54:14 (S | E)
Bonjour..

Quelques suggestions ci-dessous,bon niveau d'anglais

Humour and nonsense in children's literature
The filde(field?) under study belongs to the theme of the Imaginary World. Litterature (en anglais avec 2ts pas 3) is a good place for imagination, words imply you have to visualize by yourself what is written on the paper. And it is wonderful because, each person has not the same image of the others. Descriptions and plot lead you but after that, you are on your own, this is your experience.
I will talk you about a specific genre called non sense (un mot: nonsense).
Nonsense is not a complete gibberish, nor a parody or a satire, but a true and distinct art form which can be found in nursery rhymes and children's literature.
The individual words make sense and are arranged according to proper grammatical rules;, however the result is nonsense. It can have no real meaning for a logical mind, sometimes it's totally absurd or inapprehensible(je dirais plutot: incomprehensible), but it also what it give all its charm to this form of literature.

It appeals to children because in their education we teach them to comprehend the world in a very logical and down-to-earth way, but at the same time, they are still in a period of innocence, conducive to daydream. They play, they explore, they imagine wonderful stories, wonderful places, inspired by the stories they heard.
So because, they are on the limits ('border' irait mieux) between a very coherent world and a magical universe, they are best placed to grasp this kind of humour and enjoy it. My problematic (trop francais ,utiliser un autre mot) is the following one : How humour & non sense in children litterature can be read at different levels? (A récrire: how can...)

Let me introduce you my first document about it. It is Alice trought the looking glass by Lewis Carroll.
In this story Alice, a young girl, meets several characters, and there is a opposition between their nonsense and Alice's obstinated good sense. (nouvelle phrase)Iit is what creates humour in the book.
The episode with the White Knight illustrates that very well. With all his inventions, totally useless, uncommon or even dangerous (like the bee-hive [un mot] on the horse back[idem]), the white knight is silly (alsmot like a clown) and it is quite funny to children. Children readers identify Alice's logic but they also accept and love eccentric characters such as the White Knight.
So, Alice's adventures were written in 1865, so in the middle of the 19th century. But there is an other(un mot) classic of the children's literature, dating from 1876. It is the Tom Sawyer's Adventures. So Alice was from the brithish(arrrghhh!) literature, a product from of the Victorian Era, but the book of Mark Twain ('Mark Twain's book' est mieux) reflects Southwestern (je dirais 'southern') American humour. Tom's childhood in Hannibal was all about games, streamboats (orth a verifier, pas 'stream'), the Big Muddy and building huts in the forests in the surroungings(orth.).
To my mind, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer targeted readers a little bit older. First because Alice is still a child, and Tom is a young teenager or a “preteen”: he is 12 or 13.
But moreover the tone and the humour in Tom Sawyer is very different., it's more a social satire and Tom's tricks have an adult side, because it's based on the american culture of capitalism. → go up to social ladder, use the corruption etc...
In Tom Sawyer the humour is based on Tom's tricks, the way he manipulates everyone, his friends (the episode of the white hence orth.) and even adults thanks to his intelligence. He's as sly as a fox, a good actor, but he is a child so it's acceptable.

You discover that all the things who('who' seulement pour des personnes) made you laught have in fact an implicit message, and a very symbolic impact. That's why children's literature never really aged and can be appreciated by everyone. Humour and nonsense processes can make you laught when you're young, and make you reflect when you're older.

Over the years, people have always attempted to explain the symbolic (il faut le nom, pas l'adjectif) of Alice's story and this curious place named Wonderland.
My last document is quite revealing of this tendency to link society's concerns with a tale for children.
It is an article from The Telegraph, written by Rosa Silverman in January 2015 on the occasion of Alice in Wonderland's 150th anniversary.



Réponse: Oral/Children literature de macarena, postée le 11-06-2015 à 18:01:23 (S | E)
Merci bluestar pour ta correction et tes conseils! Beaucoup de fautes de frappe pour ma part


The field under study belongs to the theme of the Imaginary World. Literature is a good place for imagination, words imply you have to visualize by yourself what is written on the paper. And it is wonderful because each person has not the same image than the others. Descriptions and plot lead you but after that, you are on your own, this is your experience.
I will talk you about a specific genre called nonsense.
Nonsense is not a complete gibberish, nor a parody or a satire, but a true and distinct art form which can be found in nursery rhymes and children literature.
The individual words make sense and are arranged according to proper grammatical rules, however the result is nonsense. It can have no real meaning for a logical mind, sometimes it's totaly absurd or incomprehensible, but it also what it give all its charm to this form of literature.

It appeals to children because in their education we teach them to comprehend the world in a very logical and down-to-earth way, but at the same time, they are still in a period of innocence, conducive to daydream. They play, they explore, they imagine wonderful stories, wonderful places, inspired by the stories they heard.
So because, they are on the border between a very coherent world and a magical universe, they are best placed to grasp this kind of humour and enjoy it. My question is the following one : How can humour & nonsense in children literature be read at different levels?

Let me introduce you my first document about it. It is Alice through the looking glass by Lewis Carroll.
In this story Alice, a young girl, meets several characters, and there is a opposition between their nonsense and Alice's obstinate good sense/ it is what creates humour in the book.
The episode with the White Knight illustrates that very well. With all his inventions, totaly useless, uncommon or even dangerous (like the bee-hive on the horse back), the white knight is silly (almost like a clown) and it is quite funny to children. Children readers identify Alice's logic but they also accept and love eccentric characters such as the White Knight.
So, Alice's adventures were written in 1865, in the middle of the 19th century. But there is another classic of children's literature, dating from 1876. It is Tom Sawyer's Adventures. So Alice was from the british literature, a product of the Victorian Era, but Mark Twain's book reflects Southern American humour. Tom's childhood in Hannibal was all about games, steamboats, the Big Muddy and building huts in the forests in the surroundings.
To my mind, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer targeted readers a little bit older. First because Alice is still a child, and Tom is a young teenager or a “preteen” he is 12 or 13.
But moreover the tone and the humour in Tom Sawyer is very different., it's more a social satire and Tom's tricks have an adult side, because it's based on the american culture of capitalism. → go up to social ladder, use the corruption etc...
In Tom Sawyer the humour is based on Tom's tricks, the way he manipulates everyone, his friends (the episode of the white fence) and even adults thanks to his intelligence. He's as sly as a fox, a good actor, but he is a child so it's acceptable.

You discover that all the things which made you laught have in fact an implicit message, and a very symbolic impact. That's why children literature never really aged and can be appreciated by everyone. Humour and nonsense processes can make you laugh when you're young, and make you reflect when you're older.

Over the years, people have always attempted to explain the symbolism of Alice's story and this curious place named Wonderland.
My last document is quite revealing of this tendency to link society's concerns with a tale for children.
It is an article from The Telegraph, written by Rosa Silverman in January 2015 on the occasion of Alice in Wonderland's 150th anniversary.



Réponse: Oral/Children literature de bluestar, postée le 11-06-2015 à 19:10:02 (S | E)
Bonsoir..

The field under study belongs to the theme of the Imaginary World. Literature is a good place for imagination, words imply you have to visualize by yourself (de trop) what is written on the paper. And it is wonderful because each person has not the same image than as the others. Descriptions and plot lead you but after that, you are on your own, this is your experience.
I will talk you about a specific genre called nonsense.
Nonsense is not a complete gibberish, nor a parody or a satire, but a true and distinct art form which can be found in nursery rhymes and children's literature.
The individual words make sense and are arranged according to proper grammatical rules, however the result is nonsense. It can have no real meaning for a logical mind.Ssometimes it's totaly totally absurd or incomprehensible, but it also what it gives all its charm to this form of literature.

It appeals to children because in their education we teach them to comprehend the world in a very logical and down-to-earth way, but at the same time, they are still in a period of innocence, conducive to daydream. They play, they explore, they imagine wonderful stories, wonderful places, inspired by the stories they heard.
So because, they are on the border between a very coherent world and a magical universe, they are best placed to grasp this kind of humour and enjoy it. My question is the following one : How can humour & nonsense in children's literature be read at different levels?

Let me introduce you my first document about it. It is Alice through the looking glass by Lewis Carroll.
In this story Alice, a young girl, meets several characters, and there is a opposition between their nonsense and Alice's obstinate good sense/ it is what creates humour in the book.
The episode with the White Knight illustrates that very well. With all his inventions, totaly totally useless, uncommon or even dangerous (like the bee-hive beehive on the horse back horseback), the white knight is silly (almost like a clown) and it is quite funny to children. Children readers identify with Alice's logic but they also accept and love eccentric characters such as the White Knight.
So, Alice's adventures were written in 1865, in the middle of the 19th century. But there is another classic of children's literature, dating from 1876. It is Tom Sawyer's Adventures. So Alice was from the Bbritish literature, a product of the Victorian Era, but Mark Twain's book reflects Southern American humour. Tom's childhood in Hannibal was all about games, steamboats, the Big Muddy and building huts in the forests in the surroundings.
To my mind, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer targeted readers a little bit older. First because Alice is still a child, and Tom is a young teenager or a “preteen” he is 12 or 13.
But moreover the tone and the humour in Tom Sawyer is very different. Iit's more a social satire and Tom's tricks have an adult side, because it's based on the Aamerican culture of capitalism. → go up to social ladder, use the corruption (je dirais "become corrupt") etc...
In Tom Sawyer the humour is based on Tom's tricks, the way he manipulates everyone, his friends (the episode of the white fence) and even adults thanks to his intelligence. He's as sly as a fox, a good actor, but he is a child so it's acceptable.

You discover that all the things which made you laught laugh have in fact an implicit message, and a very symbolic impact. That's why children's literature never really aged and can be appreciated by everyone. Humour and nonsense processes can make you laugh when you're young, and make you reflect when you're older.

Over the years, people have always attempted to explain the symbolism of Alice's story and this curious place named Wonderland.
My last document is quite revealing of this tendency to link society's concerns with a tale for children.
It is an article from The Telegraph, written by Rosa Silverman in January 2015 on the occasion of Alice in Wonderland's 150th anniversary.



Réponse: Oral/Children literature de macarena, postée le 11-06-2015 à 19:16:19 (S | E)
The field under study belongs to the theme of the Imaginary World. Literature is a good place for imagination, words imply you have to visualize what is written on the paper. And it is wonderful because each person has not the same image as the others. Descriptions and plot lead you but after that, you are on your own, this is your experience.
I will talk you about a specific genre called nonsense.
Nonsense is not a complete gibberish, nor a parody or a satire, but a true and distinct art form which can be found in nursery rhymes and children literature.
The individual words make sense and are arranged according to proper grammatical rules, however the result is nonsense. It can have no real meaning for a logical mind, sometimes it's totally absurd or incomprehensible, but it also what it give all its charm to this form of literature.

It appeals to children because in their education we teach them to comprehend the world in a very logical and down-to-earth way, but at the same time, they are still in a period of innocence, conducive to daydream. They play, they explore, they imagine wonderful stories, wonderful places, inspired by the stories they heard.
So because, they are on the border between a very coherent world and a magical universe, they are best placed to grasp this kind of humour and enjoy it. My question is the following one : How can humour & nonsense in children literature be read at different levels?

Let me introduce you my first document about it. It is Alice through the looking glass by Lewis Carroll.
In this story Alice, a young girl, meets several characters, and there is a opposition between their nonsense and Alice's obstinate good sense/ it is what creates humour in the book.
The episode with the White Knight illustrates that very well. With all his inventions, totally useless, uncommon or even dangerous (like the beehive on horseback), the white knight is silly (almost like a clown) and it is quite funny to children. Children readers identify with Alice's logic but they also accept and love eccentric characters such as the White Knight.
So, Alice's adventures were written in 1865, in the middle of the 19th century. But there is another classic of children's literature, dating from 1876. It is Tom Sawyer's Adventures. So Alice was from the British literature, a product of the Victorian Era, but Mark Twain's book reflects Southern American humour. Tom's childhood in Hannibal was all about games, steamboats, the Big Muddy and building huts in the forests in the surroundings.
To my mind, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer targeted readers a little bit older. First because Alice is still a child, and Tom is a young teenager or a “preteen” he is 12 or 13.
But moreover the tone and the humour in Tom Sawyer is very different., It's more a social satire and Tom's tricks have an adult side, because it's based on the American culture of capitalism. → go up to social ladder, become corrupt etc...
In Tom Sawyer the humour is based on Tom's tricks, the way he manipulates everyone, his friends (the episode of the white fence) and even adults thanks to his intelligence. He's as sly as a fox, a good actor, but he is a child so it's acceptable.

You discover that all the things which made you laugh have in fact an implicit message, and a very symbolic impact. That's why children's literature never really aged and can be appreciated by everyone. Humour and nonsense processes can make you laugh when you're young, and make you reflect when you're older.



Réponse: Oral/Children literature de bluestar, postée le 12-06-2015 à 01:31:22 (S | E)
Hello,

It looks Ok to me - good luck with your oral. Just don't call the book "Tom Sawyer's Adventures" - stick to its proper name.



Réponse: Oral/Children literature de macarena, postée le 12-06-2015 à 10:49:32 (S | E)
Ok Thank you very much!




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