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Rack Your Brains/99

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Rack Your Brains/99
Message de here4u posté le 27-07-2021 à 22:54:42 (S | E | F)
Hello, dear friends!

My poor Student was very motivated and liked the short text he had to work on…
He wanted to be reassured (or not ?) about his craze for eggs… and has worked a lot! He has only left 11 mistakes in this text... Please HELP HIM CORRECT THEM, in capital letters.

Eggs : packed by protein, readily available, easy to cook and affordable. If there was such a thing that a perfect food, eggs would be a contender. Eating eggs with other foods can also help our bodies absorb more vitamins, too. But, are they really all they’re cracked up to be ?
THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE EGG.
For years, to eat eggs has been controversial, mainly due to their cholesterol content. Some studies have linked this to an increased risk of heart disease. Does that mean eating too many eggs may actually be doing us harm ? First, we need to look closer at cholesterol. It’s crucial for building cells and helps the body make vitamin D. Our liver and intestines produce all the cholesterol we need, but it’s also found in animal produce such as beef, prawns, eggs, cheese and butter. It’s carried up the body in our blood by different types of lipoprotein, and that’s important because it’s responsible for the terms ‘good’ and ‘bad’ cholesterol. /// END of Part ONE///
Firstly, researchers haven’t conclusively linked consuming cholesterol with an increased risk of heart disease. Instead, they’re far more worried with how much saturated fat or ‘trans fats’ we consume. High levels of this can be found in things as margarine, snacks or some deep-fried or baked goods. They boost our LDL (Low density Lipoprotein) cholesterol level, also known as ‘bad’ cholesterol. However, eggs (and prawns) are the only foods high in cholesterol, but low in saturated fat. That leads us onto HDL (High-Density Lipoprotein) cholesterol, which may actually be good for us. It could have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease by preventing other cholesterol of building up in the blood. If you’ve ever had a cholesterol test, you’ll know it’s the ratio of HDL to LDL that matters, as more HDL counteracts the effects of LDL. But does it all matter ? Incredibly, your body might be able to compensate the amount of cholesterol you consume, by making less itself. For the most people, dietary cholesterol isn’t a problem./// END of Part TWO/// Is one of the world’s favourite breakfast foods finally out of hot water ? One recent study did find that an additional half an egg per day was linked to a higher risk of heart disease, while one previous analysis of half a million of adults in China found the exact opposite : egg consumption was associated with a lower risk of heart disease. However, they were both observational, meaning it’s impossible to tease out cause and effect. Eggs are also a great source of lutein – a pigment that has been linked to a better eyesight and a lower risk of eye disease. Eggs may help protect us from Alzheimer’s disease through a compound called choline.
While researchers are a long way to understand truly the humble egg’s pros and cons. The vast majority of recent research suggests they pose no risk, and are much more likely to be good for our health. Cracking stuff. /// END of the Document///

This exercise has and its correction will be online on Friday, August 13th 2021.
As usual, the different parts indicated in blue), will be the different limits for the Follow Up Work (translations after the correction!)
I'm sure the FORCE will be with You!


Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de alpiem, postée le 03-08-2021 à 11:13:33 (S | E)
Hello, Here 4U and transients:

Here is my try of 99:

Eggs; Packed WITH protein, readily available, easy to cook and affordable.
If THERE WERE SUCH PERFECT A FOOD, eggs would be a contender.
Eating eggs with other food can also help our bodies absorb more vitamins too.
But are they really all THAT they're cracked up to be? THE GOOD,THE BAD,AND THE EGG.
For years, EATING eggs has been controversial,mainly due to their cholesterol content.
Some studies have linked this to an increased risk of heart dicease.
Does IT MEAN THAT eating too many eggs may actually be doing us harm? First, we need to look closer
at cholesterol.
It's crucial for building cells and help the body make vitamin D.
Our liver and intestines produce all the cholesterol we need, but it's also found in animal produce
such as beef, prowns,eggs, cheese and butter.
It's carried up the body in our blood by different types of lipoprotein, and it's important because
it's responsible for the terms 'good' and 'bad' cholesterol.///END OF PART ONE///

Firstly, researchers haven't conclusively linked consuming cholesterol with an increased risk of heart
desease.
Instead, they are far more worried with how much saturated fat or "trans fat" we consume.
High level of this can be found in things as margarine,snacks or some deep-fried or baked goods.
They boost our"ldl" cholesterol level, also known as "bad" cholesterol.
However, eggs(and prawns)are the only foods high in cholesterol, but low in saturated fat.
That leads us onto'HDL' cholesterol, which may actually be good for us.
It could have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease by preventing other cholesterol FROM
building up in the blood.
If you've ever had a chlesterol test, you'll know it's the ratio of HDL to LDL that matters, as more
HDL counteracts the effects of LDL.
But,does it all matter? Incredibly, your body might be able to compensate the amount of cholesterol you
consume, by making LESS OF IT itself.
For MOST PEOPLE,dietary cholesterol isn't a problem.///END OF PART TWO///

Is one of the world's favorite breakfast foods finaly out of hot water?
One recent study did find that an additional half an egg per day was linked to a higher risk of heart
disease, WHEREAS one previous analysis of half a million adults in China found the exact opposite:
egg consumption was associated with a lower risk of heart disiease.
However,they were both observational, meaning it's imposible to tease out cause and effect.
Eggs are also a great source of lutein-a pigment that has been linked to a better eyesight and a lower
risk of eye desease.
Eggs may help protect us from Alzheimer's disease through a compound called choline.
While researchers are a long way to TRULY understand the humble egg's pros and cons.
The vast majority of recent research suggects they pose no risk, and are much more likely to be good
for our health.Cracking stuff.//END OF/ THE Document///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de maxwell, postée le 03-08-2021 à 21:52:37 (S | E)
READY TO BE CORRECTED

Hello Here4U
I'm afraid I've added mistakes as I've found a little more than eleven mistakes. I also don't know if I've found them all... But I did my best (and I'm glad I've found 2 of them at the very last moment. Thanks a lot for this very interesting exercise!

Help My Student:
Eggs : packed WITH protein, readily available, easy to cook and affordable. If there was such a thing AS a perfect food, eggs would be a contender. Eating eggs with other foods can also help our bodies absorb more vitamins, too. But, are they really all they’re cracked up to be ?
THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE EGG.
For years, EATING eggs has been controversial, mainly due to their cholesterol content. Some studies have linked this to an increased risk of heart disease. Does that mean eating too many eggs may actually be doing us harm ? First, we need to look closer at cholesterol. It’s crucial for building cells and helps the body make vitamin D. Our liver and intestines produce all the cholesterol we need, but it’s also found in animal PRODUCTS such as beef, prawns, eggs, cheese and butter. It’s carried IN the body THROUGH our blood by different types of lipoprotein, and that’s important because it’s responsible for the terms ‘good’ and ‘bad’ cholesterol. /// END of Part ONE///

Firstly, researchers haven’t conclusively linked consuming cholesterol with an increased risk of heart disease. Instead, they’re far more worried ABOUT how much saturated fat or ‘trans FAT’ we consume. High levels of this can be found in things SUCH as margarine, snacks or some deep-fried or baked goods. They boost our LDL (Low density Lipoprotein) cholesterol level, also known as ‘bad’ cholesterol. However, eggs (and prawns) are the only foods high in cholesterol, but low in saturated fat. That leads us onto HDL (High-Density Lipoprotein) cholesterol, which may actually be good for us. It could have a protective effect against cardiovascular DISEASES by preventing other cholesterol FROM building up in the blood. If you’ve ever had a cholesterol test, you’ll know it’s the ratio of HDL to LDL that matters, as more HDL counteracts the effects of LDL. But does it all matter ? Incredibly, your body might be able to compensate the amount of cholesterol you consume, by making less itself. For [] most people, dietary cholesterol isn’t a problem./// END of Part TWO/// Is one of the world’s favourite breakfast foods finally out of hot water ? One recent study did find that HALF an additional [] egg per day was linked to a higher risk of heart disease, while one previous analysis of half a million of adults in China found the exact opposite : egg consumption was associated with a lower risk of heart disease. However, they were both observational, meaning it’s impossible to tease out cause and effect. Eggs are also a great source of lutein – a pigment that has been linked to a better eyesight and a lower risk of eye disease. Eggs may help protect us from Alzheimer’s disease through a compound called choline.
Researchers are STILL FAR FROM UNDERSTANDING truly the PROS AND CONS OF THE humble egg. The vast majority of recent research suggests they pose no risk, and are much more likely to be good for our health. Cracking stuff. /// END of the Document///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de susu52, postée le 10-08-2021 à 12:29:41 (S | E)
Hello !
Ready to be corrected.
Thanks a lot for these stimulating exercises.


Eggs : packed IN protein, readily available, easy to cook and affordable. If there was such a thing AS a perfect food, eggs would be a contender. Eating eggs with other foods can also help our bodies absorb more vitamins, too. But, are they really all they’re cracked up to be ?
THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE EGG.
For years, to eat eggs has been controversial, mainly due to their cholesterol content. Some studies have linked this to an increased risk of heart disease. Does that mean eating too many eggs may actually be doing us harm ? First, we need to look closer at cholesterol. It’s crucial for building cells and helps the body make vitamin D. Our liver and intestines produce all the cholesterol we need, but it’s also found in animal PRODUCES such as beef, prawns, eggs, cheese and butter. It’s carried up TO the body in our blood by different types of lipoprotein, and that’s important because it’s responsible for the terms ‘good’ and ‘bad’ cholesterol. /// END of Part ONE///
Firstly, researchers haven’t conclusively linked consuming cholesterol with an increased risk of heart disease. Instead, they’re far more worried with how much saturated fat or ‘trans FAT’ we consume. High levels of this can be found in things LIKE (or SUCH AS) margarine, snacks or some deep-fried or baked goods. They boost our LDL (Low density Lipoprotein) cholesterol level, also known as ‘bad’ cholesterol. However, eggs (and prawns) are the only foods high in cholesterol, but low in saturated fat. That leads us onto HDL (High-Density Lipoprotein) cholesterol, which may actually be good for us. It could have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease by preventing other cholesterol of building up in the blood. If you’ve ever had a cholesterol test, you’D know it’s the ratio of HDL to LDL that matters, as more HDL counteracts the effects of LDL. But does it all matter ? Incredibly, your body might be able to compensate the amount of cholesterol you consume, by making less itself. TO most people, dietary cholesterol isn’t a problem./// END of Part TWO/// Is one of the world’s favourite breakfast foods finally out of hot water ? One recent study did find that an additional half an egg per day was linked to a higher risk of heart disease, while one previous analysis of half a million of adults in China found the exact opposite : egg consumption was associated with a lower risk of heart disease. However, they were both observational, WHICH MEANS it’s impossible to tease out cause and effect. Eggs are also a great source of lutein – a pigment that has been linked to a better eyesight and a lower risk of eye disease. Eggs may help protect us from Alzheimer’s disease through a compound called choline.
While researchers are a long way to understand truly the humble egg’s pros and cons, THE (syntaxe: virgule + the) vast majority of recent RESEARCHES suggests they pose no risk, and are much more likely to be good for our health. Cracking stuff. /// END of the Document///

------------------
Modifié par lucile83 le 10-08-2021 13:21
bleu




Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de here4u, postée le 12-08-2021 à 21:47:21 (S | E)
Hello!

Les corrections individuelles sont envoyées ... Il reste encore un peu de temps aux retardataires !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de here4u, postée le 13-08-2021 à 23:02:29 (S | E)
Hello, dear Friends!

Les vacances se poursuivent ... C'est pourquoi je veux féliciter d'autant plus ceux parmi vous qui ont travaillé avec constance et fidélité ! Un grand BRAVO, et MERCI de votre investissement.
Le texte était "pratique" et assez court, mais les erreurs étaient "bien cachées".

Eggs. Packed with protein (1), readily available, easy to cook and affordable. If there was such a thing as (2) a perfect food, eggs would be a contender. Eating eggs with other foods can also help our bodies absorb more vitamins, too. But, are they really all they’re cracked up to be ?
THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE EGG.
For years, eating eggs has been controversial, mainly due to their cholesterol content. Some studies have linked this to an increased risk of heart disease. Does that mean eating too many eggs may actually be doing us harm ? First, we need to look closer at cholesterol. It’s crucial for building cells and helps the body make vitamin D. Our liver and intestines produce all the cholesterol we need, but it’s also found in animal produce such as beef, prawns, eggs, cheese and butter. It’s carried around (3) the body in our blood by different types of lipoprotein, and that’s important because it’s responsible for the terms ‘good’ and ‘bad’ cholesterol. /// END of Part ONE///
Firstly, researchers haven’t conclusively linked consuming cholesterol with an increased risk of heart disease. Instead, they’re far more worried about (4) how much saturated fat or ‘trans fats’ we consume. High levels of this can be found in things like margarine(5), snacks or some deep-fried or baked goods. They boost our LDL (Low density Lipoprotein) cholesterol level, also known as ‘bad’ cholesterol. However, eggs (and prawns) are the only foods high in cholesterol, but low in saturated fat. That leads us onto HDL (High-Density Lipoprotein) cholesterol, which may actually be good for us. It could have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease by preventing other cholesterol from building (6) up in the blood. If you’ve ever had a cholesterol test, you’ll know it’s the ratio of HDL to LDL that matters, as more HDL counteracts the effects of LDL. But does it all matter? Incredibly, your body might be able to compensate for (7) the amount of cholesterol you consume, by making less itself. For most people (8), dietary cholesterol isn’t a problem./// END of Part TWO/// Is one of the world’s favourite breakfast (*) foods finally out of hot water ? One recent study did find that an additional half an egg per day was linked to a higher risk of heart disease, while one previous analysis of half a million adults (9) in China found the exact opposite: egg consumption was associated with a lower risk of heart disease. However, they were both observational, meaning it’s impossible to tease out cause and effect. Eggs are also a great source of lutein – a pigment that has been linked to better eyesight (10) and a lower risk of eye disease. Eggs may help protect us from Alzheimer’s disease through a compound called choline.
While researchers are a long way from understanding (11) truly the humble egg’s pros and cons. The vast majority of recent research suggests they pose no risk, and are much more likely to be good for our health. Cracking stuff. /// END of the Document///


(1) ATTENTION ! Lien internet
: «To be packed with protein»: protein: INDENOMBRABLE : "How much protein does one egg contain?"
(2) «such... as…»: tel que, comme.
(3) «It’s carried around the body…» (image de la circulation sanguine …) alors que «up» montrerait que ce qui est important se passe … dans les pieds !
(4) To worry ABOUT something/ somebody.
(5) "things like margarine": like + nom = comme
(6) "by preventing other cholesterol from building": to prevent something FROM doING something.
(7) "to compensate FOR": Lien internet

(*) "the world’s favourite breakfast (*) foods" Attention ! Le nom breakfast est ici en position d'adjectif. Il doit rester invariable et c'est "foods" le nom (qui est en position nominale ) qui doit s'accorder. (one of the foods!)
(8) La plupart des gens : "most people". Revoir la leçon : Lien internet

(9) "…of half a million of adults": "analysis of half a million adults": Lien internet

(10) linked to better eyesight: pas d’article ! «eyesight» : indénombrable.
(11) a long way FROM understanding

Comme toujours, nous avons besoin de volontaires pour le Follow Up Work (traduction des différentes parties du corrigé). Merci de vous déclarer. Je vous rappelle que ce travail n'est PAS URGENT, mais que j'ai besoin de savoir assez vite le nom des volontaires courageux.
Un grand d'avance ! et, juste pour le plaisir, la vidéo :

Lien internet


Merci de votre collaboration compétente et efficace !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de magie8, postée le 14-08-2021 à 08:50:03 (S | E)
hello bonjour
je travaille sur la traduction de la 1ere partie, à bientôt 🎃😇😘❤️



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de magie8, postée le 14-08-2021 à 10:46:10 (S | E)
HELLO

Eggs. Packed with protein (1), readily available, easy to cook and affordable. If there was such a thing as (2) a perfect food, eggs would be a contender. Eating eggs with other foods can also help our bodies absorb more vitamins, too. But, are they really all they’re cracked up to be ?
THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE EGG.
For years, eating eggs has been controversial, mainly due to their cholesterol content. Some studies have linked this to an increased risk of heart disease. Does that mean eating too many eggs may actually be doing us harm ? First, we need to look closer at cholesterol. It’s crucial for building cells and helps the body make vitamin D. Our liver and intestines produce all the cholesterol we need, but it’s also found in animal produce such as beef, prawns, eggs, cheese and butter. It’s carried around (3) the body in our blood by different types of lipoprotein, and that’s important because it’s responsible for the terms ‘good’ and ‘bad’ cholesterol. /// END of Part ONE/

Les oeufs. Un paquet de protéines, facilement disponibles, faciles à cuire et abordables. Si l'on cherchait la nourriture parfaite, les oeufs seraient candidats. Manger des oeufs avec d'autres nourritures aide notre corps à absorber aussi plus de vitamines. Mais, en réalité sont-ils aussi bons qu'on le prétend ?
LE BON,LE MECHANT ET L'OEUF.
Depuis des années, manger des oeufs est très controversé. Principalement à cause de leur teneur en cholestérol. Quelques études ont démontré le lien du cholestérol
avec les maladies cardio-vasculaires. Est-ce que cela signifie que manger trop d'oeufs peut réellement nous faire du mal. Tout d'abord nous devons regarder de plus près le cholestérol. Il est essentiel pour construire les cellules et aider le corps à fabriquer la vitamine D. Notre foie, nos intestins produisent tout le cholestérol dont nous avons besoin, mais il est aussi trouvé dans les produits issus des animaux tels que le boeuf, les crevettes, les oeufs, fromage et beurre. Il est charrié dans notre corps et dans le sang par différents types de lipoprotéines, et c'est important car il est responsable à terme "du bon ou mauvais cholestérol."



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de maxwell, postée le 14-08-2021 à 12:09:07 (S | E)
READY TO BE CORRECTED
Hello!
Je prendrai la 2e partie après avoir compris mes erreurs

Part II:
Firstly, researchers haven’t conclusively linked consuming cholesterol with an increased risk of heart disease. Instead, they’re far more worried about how much saturated fat or ‘trans fats’ we consume. High levels of this can be found in things like margarine, snacks or some deep-fried or baked goods. They boost our LDL (Low density Lipoprotein) cholesterol level, also known as ‘bad’ cholesterol. However, eggs (and prawns) are the only foods high in cholesterol, but low in saturated fat. That leads us onto HDL (High-Density Lipoprotein) cholesterol, which may actually be good for us. It could have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease by preventing other cholesterol from building up in the blood. If you’ve ever had a cholesterol test, you’ll know it’s the ratio of HDL to LDL that matters, as more HDL counteracts the effects of LDL. But does it all matter? Incredibly, your body might be able to compensate for the amount of cholesterol you consume, by making less itself. For most people, dietary cholesterol isn’t a problem.

Premièrement, les chercheurs n'ont pas définitivement établi de lien de causalité entre l'absorption de cholestérol et un risque accru de maladie cardiaque. Au lieu de cela, ils sont nettement plus inquiets au sujet de la quantité de graisse saturée et d'acides gras trans que nous ingérons. On peut en trouver en forte proportion par exemple dans la margarine, les en-cas, ou certaines fritures et viennoiseries. Ils remontent notre niveau de cholestérol LDL (lipoprotéines de faible densité) aussi connu sous le nom de "mauvais" cholestérol. Néanmoins, les oeufs (et les crevettes) sont les seuls aliments élevés en cholestérol mais faibles en acides gras saturés. Cela nous mène au cholestérol HDL (lipoprotéines de haute densité), qui peut en réalité être bon pour nous. Il pourrait avoir un effet protecteur contre les maladies cardiovasculaires en empêchant l'autre cholestérol de s'accumuler dans le sang. Si vous avez déjà subi un test de cholestérol, vous savez que c'est le ratio de HDL sur LDL qui compte car davantage de HDL contrebalance les effets du LDL. Mais est-ce que tout cela a de l'importance ? Aussi incroyable que cela puisse paraître, notre corps pourrait être capable de compenser la quantité de cholestérol qu'on consomme en en produisant moins lui-même. Pour la plupart des gens, le cholestérol alimentaire n'est pas un problème.

J'ai une question si j'ai bien traduit : pourquoi n'y a-t-il pas "the" devant "other cholesterol" (en bleu dans le texte) ?



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de susu52, postée le 15-08-2021 à 12:07:14 (S | E)
J'aimerais prendre la dernière partie pour la traduction que je ferai dans la semaine.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de here4u, postée le 15-08-2021 à 22:12:54 (S | E)
Hello, susu!

Avec plaisir ! Ce travail n'est pas pressé ... Je vous rappelle aussi que plusieurs d'entre vous peuvent traduire le même extrait (sans regarder les autres traductions, bien sûr! je corrige tout! )



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de here4u, postée le 16-08-2021 à 09:44:53 (S | E)
Hello, dear Friends,

Correction du Follow Up Work;

Eggs. Packed with protein, readily available, easy to cook and affordable. If there was such a thing as a perfect food, eggs would be a contender. Eating eggs with other foods can also help our bodies absorb more vitamins, too. But, are they really all they’re cracked up to be ?
THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE EGG.
For years, eating eggs has been controversial, mainly due to their cholesterol content. Some studies have linked this to an increased risk of heart disease. Does that mean eating too many eggs may actually be doing us harm ? First, we need to look closer at cholesterol. It’s crucial for building cells and helps the body make vitamin D. Our liver and intestines produce all the cholesterol we need, but it’s also found in animal produce such as beef, prawns, eggs, cheese and butter. It’s carried around the body in our blood by different types of lipoprotein, and that’s important because it’s responsible for the terms ‘good’ and ‘bad’ cholesterol.

Les oeufs. Un paquet de protéines Pleins de protéines/ Bourrés de protéines, facilement disponibles, faciles à cuire cuisiner et abordables. Si l'on cherchait la nourriture parfaite, les oeufs seraient candidats. Manger des oeufs avec d'autres nourritures aide notre corps à absorber aussi plus de vitamines. Mais, en réalité sont-ils aussi bons qu'on le prétend ?
LE BON,LE MECHANT ET L'OEUF.
Depuis des années, manger des oeufs est très controversé. Principalement à cause de leur teneur en cholestérol. Quelques études ont démontré le lien du cholestérol avec les maladies cardio-vasculaires. Est-ce que cela signifie que manger trop d'oeufs peut réellement nous faire du mal. Tout d'abord nous devons regarder de plus près le cholestérol. Il est essentiel pour construire les cellules et aider le corps à fabriquer la vitamine D. Notre foie, nos intestins produisent tout le cholestérol dont nous avons besoin, mais on le trouve aussi dans les produits issus des animaux tels que le boeuf, les crevettes, les oeufs, le fromage et le beurre. Il est charrié dans notre corps et dans le sang par différents types de lipoprotéines, et c'est important car il est responsable à terme "du bon ou mauvais cholestérol." (il entraîne/ justifie les termes/ est responsable des termes "bon et mauvais cholestérols".
Très bon travail, Magie! Bravo ! J'aimerais que tes camarades regardent ce qui est souligné, et non corrigé, et trouvent moins maladroit ...

Firstly, researchers haven’t conclusively linked consuming cholesterol with an increased risk of heart disease. Instead, they’re far more worried about how much saturated fat or ‘trans fats’ we consume. High levels of this can be found in things like margarine, snacks or some deep-fried or baked goods. They boost our LDL (Low density Lipoprotein) cholesterol level, also known as ‘bad’ cholesterol. However, eggs (and prawns) are the only foods high in cholesterol, but low in saturated fat. That leads us onto HDL (High-Density Lipoprotein) cholesterol, which may actually be good for us. It could have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease by preventing other cholesterol from building up in the blood. If you’ve ever had a cholesterol test, you’ll know it’s the ratio of HDL to LDL that matters, as more HDL counteracts the effects of LDL. But does it all matter? Incredibly, your body might be able to compensate for the amount of cholesterol you consume, by making less itself. For most people, dietary cholesterol isn’t a problem.

Premièrement, les chercheurs n'ont pas définitivement établi de lien de causalité entre l'absorption de cholestérol et un risque accru de maladie cardiaque. Au lieu de cela, ils sont nettement plus inquiets au sujet de la quantité de graisse saturée et d'acides gras-trans que nous ingérons. On peut en trouver en forte proportion par exemple dans la margarine, les en-cas, ou certaines fritures et viennoiseries. Ils remontent notre niveau de cholestérol LDL (lipoprotéines de faible densité) aussi connu sous le nom de "mauvais" cholestérol. Néanmoins, les oeufs (et les crevettes) sont les seuls aliments élevés en cholestérol mais faibles en acides gras saturés. Cela nous mène au cholestérol HDL (lipoprotéines de haute densité), qui peut en réalité être bon pour nous. Il pourrait avoir un effet protecteur contre les maladies cardiovasculaires en empêchant l'autre cholestérol de s'accumuler dans le sang. Si vous avez déjà subi un test de cholestérol, vous savez que c'est le ratio de HDL sur LDL qui compte car davantage de HDL contrebalance les effets du LDL. Mais est-ce que tout cela a de l'importance ? Aussi incroyable que cela puisse paraître, notre corps pourrait être capable de compenser la quantité de cholestérol que l'on consomme en en produisant moins lui-même. Pour la plupart des gens, le cholestérol alimentaire n'est pas un problème.
C'est PARFAIT, Maxwell !

Is one of the world’s favourite breakfast foods finally out of hot water ? One recent study did find that an additional half an egg per day was linked to a higher risk of heart disease, while one previous analysis of half a million adults in China found the exact opposite: egg consumption was associated with a lower risk of heart disease. However, they were both observational, meaning it’s impossible to tease out cause and effect. Eggs are also a great source of lutein – a pigment that has been linked to better eyesight and a lower risk of eye disease. Eggs may help protect us from Alzheimer’s disease through a compound called choline.
While researchers are a long way from understanding truly the humble egg’s pros and cons, the vast majority of recent research suggests they pose no risk, and are much more likely to be good for our health. Cracking stuff.

A) L'un des aliments préférés du monde pour le petit-déjeuner est-il enfin controversé ?(non! C'est le contraire !) tiré d'affaire !
Une étude récente a révélé qu'un demi-œuf supplémentaire par jour était lié à un risque plus élevé de maladie cardiaque, alors qu'une analyse précédente portant sur un demi-million d'adultes en Chine a montré exactement le contraire : la consommation d'œufs était associée à un risque moins élevé de maladies cardiaques. Cependant, il s'agissait dans les deux cas d'observations , ce qui signifie qu'il est impossible d'établir une relation de cause à effet. Les œufs sont également une source importante de lutéine, . Un pigment qui a été associé à une meilleure vue et à un risque moins élevé de maladie oculaire. Les œufs peuvent contribuer à nous protéger de la maladie d'Alzheimer grâce à un composé appelé choline.
Alors que les chercheurs sont loin de comprendre vraiment les avantages et les inconvénients de cet humble œuf, la grande majorité des recherches récentes indique qu'ils ne posent aucun risque et qu'ils sont vraisemblablement bons pour notre santé. C'est génial.

Bravo, Swan ! C'est un TBon travail !

B) L'un de nos petits déjeuners préférés est -il réellement hors de causes? Un étude récente suggère en fait que la consommation d'une moitié d’œuf supplémentaire par jour serait liée à un risque accrue de développer des maladies cardiaques. Tandis qu'une analyse antérieure faite sur un demi-million de Chinois d'âge adulte prouvent le contraire : cependant ces deux études étant basées sur l’observation, il est impossible d'en déduire une réelle relation de causes à effets.
Cela dit, l’œuf est également riche en lutéine, un pigment qui posséderait des propriétés bénéfiques pour la vue ainsi que dans la prévention de maladies oculaires. Il serait aussi en mesure de nous prémunir contre la maladie d’Alzheimer grâce à un nutriment appelé la choline.
Bien que les chercheurs soient encore loin de pleinement saisir les réelles implications de notre petit œuf sur notre santé, la grande majorité des recherches tendent à démontrer qu'il est sans danger. Chouette !/ Craquant, non ?

Un grand merci et BRAVO, Susu ! Texte très bien compris !

Bravo à tous les quatre !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de maxwell, postée le 18-08-2021 à 20:06:54 (S | E)
Hello!

Packed with protein = pleins de protéines
easy to cook = faciles à cuisiner



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de magie8, postée le 19-08-2021 à 13:58:49 (S | E)
hello , j'avais pensé riche en protéines mais ce n'était pas vraiment la traduction du mot packed.
faciles à cuisiner c'est plus élégant j'aurai dû y penser aussi plus tôt à bientôt merci 😇



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de here4u, postée le 22-08-2021 à 08:10:19 (S | E)
Hello Dears,

Anyone to help ( and double) susu to close this exercise?



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de swan85, postée le 23-08-2021 à 08:42:10 (S | E)
Bonjour
En attendant le travail de SUSU et en accord avec Here4U, voici ce que je propose :

''
L'un des aliments préférés du monde pour le petit-déjeuner est-il enfin controversé ?
Une étude récente a révélé qu'un demi-œuf supplémentaire par jour était lié à un risque plus élevé de maladie cardiaque, alors qu'une analyse précédente portant sur un demi-million d'adultes en Chine a montré exactement le contraire : la consommation d'œufs était associée à un risque moins élevé de maladies cardiaques. Cependant, il s'agissait dans les deux cas d'observations, ce qui signifie qu'il est impossible d'établir une relation de cause à effet. Les œufs sont également une source importante de lutéine. Un pigment qui a été associé à une meilleure vue et à un risque moins élevé de maladie oculaire. Les œufs peuvent contribuer à nous protéger de la maladie d'Alzheimer grâce à un composé appelé choline.
Alors que les chercheurs sont loin de comprendre vraiment les avantages et les inconvénients de cet humble œuf. La grande majorité des recherches récentes indique qu'ils ne posent aucun risque et qu'ils sont vraisemblablement bons pour notre santé. C'est génial.
''



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de here4u, postée le 23-08-2021 à 09:11:28 (S | E)
Hello!

Un grand Swan!



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de susu52, postée le 23-08-2021 à 12:26:15 (S | E)
Coucou

voici ma traduction.
Je ne suis pas habitué à ce genre d'exercice, mais j'ai fait de mon mieux !

L'un de nos petits déjeuners préférés est -il réellement hors de causes? Un étude récente suggère en fait que la consommation d'une moitié d’œuf supplémentaire par jour serait liée à un risque accru de développer des maladies cardiaques. Tandis qu'une analyse antérieure faite sur un demi-million de chinois d'âge adulte prouvent le contraire. Cependant ces deux études étant basées sur l’observation, il est impossible d'en déduire une réelle relation de causes à effets.
Cela dit, l’œuf est également riche en lutéine, un pigment qui posséderait des propriétés bénéfiques pour la vue ainsi que dans la prévention de maladies oculaires. Il serait aussi en mesure de nous prémunir contre la maladie d’Alzheimer grâce à un nutriment appelé la choline.
Bien que les chercheurs soient encore loin de pleinement saisir les réelles implications de notre petit œuf sur notre santé, la grande majorité des recherches tendent à démontrer qu'il est sans danger. Chouette !

-------------------
Modifié par susu52 le 23-08-2021 15:28





Réponse : Rack Your Brains/99 de here4u, postée le 23-08-2021 à 17:12:17 (S | E)
Hello!

Correction du FuW terminée !(ci-dessus!) Un grand merci à nos quatre volontaires !




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