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Rack Your Brains and Help/88

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

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Rack Your Brains and Help/88
Message de here4u posté le 11-02-2021 à 10:40:05 (S | E | F)
Hello dear hardworkers!

Voici un nouvel appel à l'aide de la part de "my poor Student" qui a, encore une fois, besoin d'un petit coup de pouce... Le pauvre a, selon lui, "fait tout son possible", mais a tout de même laissé 12 fautes ... Pourriez-vous l'aider à les corriger ? (en lettres capitales, please ! Je n'ose plus dire que le texte est court (et "assez facile" ... )
Un grand merci !

Ce texte contient 12 fautes ! (and some of them have been repeated all along the text! )

A lot of Latinos and Mexicans don’t speak Spanish. They think they are «very Mexican» and «very Latino» anyway because it’s a lot about an engagement to the community, an engagement to a culture, and how you upload that and pass it over. A Latino raper wrote «Tongue Troubles» by shame and embarrassment. At a certain point, he didn’t know what to do with all these feelings he had around his ability – or inability – to speak Spanish. He grew up in Orange County, California in a mixed-race household: his mother is from England, his father is from Mexico where they have met. His mother was actually his father’s English teacher. She taught at an adult English school, and thought that his father was very witty and a good dancer. His mother built a relationship with his brother speaking English.///END of PART ONE/// It’s not easy for a mother changing the language she’s speaking to her child. She just continued speaking English to his brother. Simultaneously, his father was then in a pressured position to learn English as well. So there was a lot of English happening in the household and then, when he was born, English became the dominant spoken language in their household, which kind of «sucked». He thinks a lot of people have shame in private. The language, I think, is like an immediate identifier of a person’s authenticity as a Latino. He was often told – «Oh, you’re not a real Mexican if you can’t do this or if you can’t speak in Spanish, if you can’t dance…» You stumble through awkwardness. You go through it. You have to ask how you say this.///END of PART TWO/// But that ‘s just part of it, right? A lot of them struggle in language. Struggling in language is now the new authentic Latino.
He likes interacting with his family in Mexico around the dinner table, about how often he does speak Spanish. It kind of takes a positive turn that with family, they’re like, «Whatever the language.» You’re around, they’re just so happy to be there and we forget all about it, and then he says the wrong word… The relationship that he has developed now with Spanish is much more logical. He speaks more and more Spanish. He wants to be able to speak Spanish fluently. It has much less to do with his fulfilment as being real Mexican or real Latino, because at some point, it’s not about which fault it is, but which responsibility it is. That’s it ! ///END of the TEXT///
Cet exercice est un et la correction sera en ligne le jeudi 25 février tard.

I'm sure THE FORCE will be with You.

Take care of yourselves and your loved ones.


Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/88 de taiji43, postée le 15-02-2021 à 17:49:53 (S | E)
Dear Here4U
I'm aware that I'm not at all sure about the correction or non-correction of a few sentences, but a little war weary (de guerre lasse) after a lot of questioning, I decided to send this correction

READY TO BE CORRECTED

A lot of Latinos and Mexicans don’t speak Spanish. They think they are «really OR A REAL Mexican» and «really OR A REAL »Latino anyway because it’s a lot about A COMMITMENT to the community, A COMMITMENT to a culture, and how you BEAR IT IN MIND and pass it ON A Latino rapper wrote «Tongue Troubles» by shame and embarrassment. At a certain point OR TO A CERTAIN EXTENT, he didn’t know what to do with all these feelings he had ABOUT his ability – or inability – to speak Spanish. He grew up in Orange County, California in a mixed-race household : his mother is from England, his father is from Mexico where they MET. His mother was actually his father’s English teacher. She taught at an adult English school, and thought that his father was very witty and a good dancer. His mother built a relationship with his brother speaking English.///END of PART ONE///

It’s not easy for a mother TO CHANGE the language she SPOKE to her child. She just continued speaking English to his brother. Simultaneously, his father was then in a pressured position to learn English as well. So there was a lot of English ARRIVING AT the household and then, when he was born, English became the dominant spoken language in their household which is (OR WAS) kind of «sucked». He thinks a lot of peopleWERE ASHAMED in private. The language, I think, is like an immediate identifier of a person’s authenticity as a Latino. He was often told – «Oh, you’re not a real Mexican if you can’t do this or if you can’t speak in Spanish, if you can’t dance…» You stumble through awkwardness. You go through it. You have to ask how you say this.///END of PART TWO///

But that ‘s just part of it, right? A lot of them struggle WITH language. Struggling WITH language is now the new authentic Latino.
He likes interacting with his family in Mexico around the dinner table, about how often he SPEAKS Spanish. It kind of takes a positive turn that with family, they’re like, «Whatever the language. (IS) ( avec whatever is n’est pas obligatoire) » You’re around, WE ( on) are just so happy to be there and we forget all about it, and then he says the wrong word… The relationship that he has developed now with Spanish is much more logical. He speaks more and more Spanish. He wants to be able to speak Spanish fluently. It has much less to do with his fulfilment as being A REAL Mexican or A REAL Latino, because at some point OR EXTENT , it’s not about WHAT fault it is, but WHAT responsibility it is. That’s it ! ///END of the TEXT///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/88 de maxwell, postée le 17-02-2021 à 17:28:01 (S | E)
READY TO BE CORRECTED
Hello Here4U
I'm sorry, I found this text too hard: there are many parts that I didn't understand. It's giving me headaches... Too bad. Thanks anyway

A lot of Latinos and Mexicans don’t speak Spanish. They think they are «very Mexican» and «very Latino» anyway because it’s a lot about an engagement to the community, an engagement to a culture, and how you OVERCOME that and pass it over. A Latino RAPPER wrote «Tongue Troubles» OUT OF  shame and embarrassment. At a certain point, he didn’t know what to do with all these feelings he had ABOUT his ability – or inability – to speak Spanish. He grew up in Orange County, California in a mixed-race household: his mother WAS from England, his father WAS from Mexico where they HAD met. His mother was actually his father’s English teacher. She taught at an adult English school, and thought that his father was very witty and a good dancer. His mother built a relationship with his brother, speaking English.///END of PART ONE/// 
It’s not easy for a mother TO CHANGE the language she’s speaking to her child. She just continued speaking English to his brother. Simultaneously, his father was then in a pressured position to learn English as well. So there was a lot of English happening in the household and then, when he was born, English became the dominant spoken language in their household, which kind of «sucked». He thinks a lot of people have shame in private. "The language, I think, is like an immediate identifier of a person’s authenticity as a Latino". He was often told – «Oh, you’re not a real Mexican if you can’t do this or if you can’t speak in Spanish, if you can’t dance…» You stumble through awkwardness. You go through it. You have to ask how you say this.///END of PART TWO/// But that's just part of it, right? A lot of them struggle in language. Struggling in language is now the new authentic Latino.
He likes interacting with his family in Mexico around the dinner table, about how often he does speak Spanish. It kind of takes a positive turn that with family, they’re like, «Whatever the language.» You’re around, they’re just so happy to be there and we forget all about it, and then he says the wrong word… The relationship that he has developed now with Spanish is much more logical. He speaks more and more Spanish. He wants to be able to speak Spanish fluently. It has much less to do with his fulfilment  THAN being real Mexican or real Latino, because at some point, it’s not about which fault it is, but which responsibility it is. That’s it ! ///END of the TEXT///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/88 de here4u, postée le 18-02-2021 à 10:01:23 (S | E)
Too hard??? Really??? If so, I'm really sorry!

Remember you can concentrate on ONE PART ONLY, if you think it's really too difficult and/or time/ energy consuming... I really don't want to put you off!



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/88 de joe39, postée le 19-02-2021 à 19:27:21 (S | E)
Hello dear here4u,
after great struggle and atrocious doubts,
I send you my work, ready to be corrected
12 mistakes.
A lot of Latinos and Mexicans don’t speak Spanish. They think they are «very Mexican» and «very Latino» anyway because it’s a lot about COMMITMENT - 1 to the community, a COMMITMENT to a culture, and how you UPHOLD -2 that and pass it over. A Latino RAPPER -3 wrote «Tongue troubles» OUT OF - 4 shame and embarrassment. At a certain point, he didn’t know what to do with all these feelings he had around his ability – or inability – to speak Spanish. He grew up in Orange County, California in a mixed-race household: his mother is from England, his father is from Mexico where they have ENGAGED -5. His mother was actually his father’s English teacher.
She taught at an adult English school, and thought that his father was very witty and a good dancer. His mother built a relationship with his brother, speaking IN- 6 English.///END of PART ONE///

It’s not easy for a mother TO CHANGE - 7 the language she’s speaking to her child IN . She just continued speaking English to his brother. Simultaneously, his father was then in a pressured condition to learn English as well. So there was a lot of English happening in the household and then, when he was born, English became the dominant spoken language in their household, which kind of sucked .

He thinks a lot of people have shame in private. The language, HE THINKS - 8, is like an immediate identifier of a person’s authenticity as a Latino. He was often told – «Oh, you’re not a real Mexican if you can’t do this or if you can’t speak Spanish, OR -9 you can’t dance…» You STUMBLE AWKWARDLY -10 through awkwardness. You go through it. You have to ask how you say this.///END of PART TWO///
But that ‘s just part of it, right? A lot of them struggle WITH - 11 language. Struggling WITH language is now the new authentic Latino.
He likes interacting with his family in Mexico around the dinner table, about how often he does speak Spanish. It kind of takes a positive turn that with family, they’ re like «Whatever the language.» You’re around, they’re just so happy to be there and we forget all about it, and then he says the wrong word… The relationship that he has developed now with Spanish is much more logical. He speaks more and more Spanish. He wants to be able to speak Spanish fluently. It has much less to do with his fulfilment as being A - 12 real Mexican or A real Latino, because at some point, it’s not about WHOSE FAULT IT IS - 13, but WHOSE responsibility it is. That’s it ! ///END of the TEXT///

Thanking you very much for this interesting theme, I hope you have a nice weekend. Stay safe and take care, because the nightmare is not over yet.
Joe39



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/88 de maya92, postée le 20-02-2021 à 17:01:57 (S | E)
A lot of Latinos and Mexicans don’t speak Spanish. They think they are «very Mexican» and «very Latino» anyway because it’s a lot about an engagement to the community, an engagement to a culture, and how you upload that and pass it ALONG. A Latino RAPPER wrote «Tongue Troubles» by shame and embarrassment. At a certain point, he didn’t know what to do with all these feelings he had ABOUT his ability – or inability – to speak Spanish. He grew up in THE Orange County, California in a mixed-race household: his mother is from England, his father is from Mexico where they met. His mother was actually his father’s English teacher. She taught at an adult English school, and thought that his father was very witty and a good dancer. His mother built a relationship with his brother speaking English.///END of PART ONE///

It’s not easy for a mother TO CHANGE the language she speaks to her child. She just continued speaking English to his brother. Simultaneously, his father was then in a pressured position to learn English as well. So there was a lot of English (happening) in the household and then, when he was born, English became the dominant spoken language in their household, WITH kind of «sucked». He thinks a lot of people ARE ASHAMED in private. The language, I think, is like an immediate identifier of a person’s authenticity as a Latino. He was often told – «Oh, you’re not a real Mexican if you can’t do this or if you can’t speak (in) Spanish, if you can’t dance…» You stumble through awkwardness. You go through it. You have to ask how you say this.///END of PART TWO///

But that‘s just part of it, right? A lot of them struggle WITH language. Struggling in language is now the new authentic Latino.
He likes interacting with his family in Mexico around the dinner table, about how often he does speak Spanish. It’S kind of takING positive turn with family, they’re like, «Whatever the language.» You’re around, they’re just so happy to be there and we forget all about it, and then he says the wrong word… The relationship that he has developed now with Spanish is much more logical. He speaks more and more Spanish. He wants to be able to speak Spanish fluently. It has much less to do with his fulfillment THAN being real Mexican or real Latino, because at some point, it’s not about which fault it is, but which responsibility it is. That’s it ! ///END of the TEXT///

Cet exercice est un 6 étoiles ...
Comme Maxwell j'ai trouvé ce texte horriblement difficile (je n'ai d'ailleurs pas tout très bien compris ...). J'ai du trouver 6 ou 7 fautes à tout casser ou alors autant de fautes que de mots ..
Dur à traduire en tout cas ..



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/88 de here4u, postée le 21-02-2021 à 15:47:11 (S | E)
Ohhhh Dear! ... 6 stars now? I'm ever so sorry I seem to have misjudged the difficulty of the exercise...

What can I do to help? Nothing much, I'm afraid...

Be reassured (if possible!) I have finished preparing the following RYB, and (completely traumatised as I am... ) temporarily changed the concept totally, just to give you some brief relief and the possibility to "pick and choose" depending on your wishes and availabilities of the moment... Sorry again!



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/88 de here4u, postée le 25-02-2021 à 22:52:13 (S | E)
Hello, Dear Friends!

Voici votre correction de cette "torture" que je vous ai infligée ! (sans coeur que je suis ... )

A lot of Latinos and Mexicans don’t speak Spanish. They think they are « very Mexican » and « very Latino » anyway because it’s a lot about a commitment (1) to the community, a commitment(1) to a culture, and how you uphold (2) that and pass it along (3).
A Latino rapper(4) wrote « Tongue Troubles » out of (5) shame and embarrassment. At a certain point, he didn’t know what to do with all these feelings he had around his ability – or inability – to speak Spanish. He grew up in Orange County, California in a mixed-race household :his mother is from England, his father is from Mexico where they met (6). His mother was actually his father’s English teacher. She taught at an adult English school, and thought that his father was very witty and a good dancer. His mother built a relationship with his brother speaking in English (7).///END of PART ONE /// It’s not easy for a mother to change(8) the language she’s speaking to her child in (7). She just continued speaking in English (7) to his brother. Simultaneously, his father was then in a pressured position to learn English as well. So there was a lot of English happening in the household and then, when he was born, English became the dominant spoken language in their household, which kind of « sucked ». He thinks a lot of people have shame in private. The language, he thinks, is like an immediate identifier of a person’s authenticity as a Latino. He was often told – «Oh, you’re not a real Mexican if you can’t do this or if you can’t speak Spanish, if you can’t dance…» You stumble through the awkwardness (9). You go through it. You have to ask how you say this.///END of PART TWO /// But that's just part of it, right? A lot of them struggle with language (10). Struggling with language (10) is now the new authentic Latino.
He likes interacting with his family in Mexico around the dinner table, about how often he does speak in Spanish. It kind of takes a positive turn that with family, they’re like, «Whatever the language.» You’re around, they’re just so happy to be there and we forget all about it, and then he says the wrong word… The relationship that he has developed now with Spanish is much more logical. He speaks more and more Spanish. He wants to be able to speak Spanish fluently. It has much less to do with his fulfilment as being a real Mexican or a real Latino (11), because at some point, it’s not about whose fault (12) it is, but whose (12) responsibility it is. That’s it ! /// END of the TEXT///


(1) S’engager/ un engagement : to commit=> to be committed to + ing/ a commitment; commit - English-French Dictionary WordReference.com engagement: engagement - English-French Dictionary WordReference.com
(2) To upload : upload - English-French Dictionary WordReference.com // uphold : uphold - English-French Dictionary WordReference.com
(3) To pass over: pass over - English-French Dictionary WordReference.com n’était pas du tout dans la logique du texte. Pass along: pass along - English-French Dictionary WordReference.com : faire passer, transmettre.
(4) a raper/ rapist: le nom dérivé du verbe to rape; violer /// a rapper: nom dérivé du verbe «to rap»!
(5) par, à cause de : out of=> out of shame.
(6) … where they met: la rencontre des parents a eu lieu dans le passé. Bien sûr, les parents sont encore ensemble (ou peuvent l’être …) mais leur RENCONTRE, le moment de la rencontre est terminé, appartient au passé révolu => prétérit.
(7) Bien faire la différence entre «to speak English» et «to speak in English»: certains l’ont ressentie, mais pas toujours maîtrisée … C’est difficile et cela dépend un peu des intentions du locuteur. differences - "Speak English" vs. "speak in English" - English Language & Usage Stack Exchange
(8) «it’s not easy»: forme impersonnelle (it’s difficult/ it’s impossible/ it’s unbelievable…) forcément suivi de la proposition infinitive : It’s not easy for a mother to change the language…
(9) You stumble through the awkwardness. awkwardness - English-French Dictionary WordReference.com est un nom abstrait (sans article) mais ici , il ne s’agit pas de la maladresse en général, imprécise … mais celle, très définie (par l’article « the ») du moment où l’on fait remarquer au personnage que ce n’est pas un « vrai latino » !
(10) to struggle WITH something/ someone était répété deux fois.
(11) un vrai Mexicain = A real Mexican/ A real Latino.
(12) about whose fault it is, but whose responsibility : which : que/ qui lorsque l’antécédent est une chose, un objet. /// ,which : ce qui, ce que (reprend une proposition). MAIS n’oubliez pas la possession (la responsabilité DE QUI/ la faute DE QUI !)


En faisant ce corrigé, je me rends compte que la difficulté tenait dans le petit nombre de fautes, qui étaient donc bien « cachées », l’air de rien ! Elles étaient cependant toutes à votre portée, je le maintiens !
Maintenant, nous allons voir ce qu’il en sera de la traduction … Quels seront les « héros » qui vont s’y frotter ? Tous nos remerciements les accompagnent, en tout cas !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/88 de maxwell, postée le 27-02-2021 à 11:50:49 (S | E)
FINISHED
Hello!
Je vais me risquer à traduire le 2e paragraphe...

Part II:
It’s not easy for a mother to change the language she’s speaking to her child in. She just continued speaking in English to his brother. Simultaneously, his father was then in a pressured position to learn English as well. So there was a lot of English happening in the household and then, when he was born, English became the dominant spoken language in their household, which kind of « sucked ». He thinks a lot of people have shame in private. The language, he thinks, is like an immediate identifier of a person’s authenticity as a Latino. He was often told – «Oh, you’re not a real Mexican if you can’t do this or if you can’t speak Spanish, if you can’t dance…» You stumble through the awkwardness. You go through it. You have to ask how you say this.

Il n'est pas facile pour une mère de changer la langue dans laquelle elle parle à son enfant. Elle a simplement continué à parler en anglais à son frère. Dans le même temps, son père était alors poussé à apprendre l'anglais également. Il y avait donc beaucoup d'anglais dans le foyer et puis, à sa naissance, l'anglais devint la langue orale dominante dans leur foyer, ce qui "craignait" un peu. Il pense que beaucoup de gens ont honte en privé. Le langage, selon lui, est comme une marqueur immédiat de l'authenticité d'une personne en tant que latino. On lui a souvent dit : "Oh, tu n'es pas un vrai mexicain si tu ne sais pas faire ceci ou si tu ne sais pas parler espagnol, si tu ne sais pas danser...." Vous traversez la gêne en trébuchant. Vous passez par là. Vous devez demander comment on dit ceci.


Ces passages incessants et brutaux entre le passé et le présent me mettent mal à l'aise et j'ai du mal à suivre...




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