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Rack your brains and help! /74

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Rack your brains and help! /74
Message de here4u posté le 10-07-2020 à 18:01:04 (S | E | F)
Hello, dear Hard-working Friends,

Throughout the confinement, and now that we're out of it, you've worked like ! and I thank and CONGRATULATE you A LOT for it! I hope the coming holiday will not reduce your enthusiasm and curiosity.
This time my Student has chosen what might look like a news item but may in fact be the starting point of an important research which will change our great-grandkids' lives forever... Who knows? Fingers crossed...

PLEASE, HELP MY STUDENT. HE NEEDS YOU. In spite of his efforts, he has left 20 mistakes in this text...

It was a desperate situation. A 19 years old turkish woman with liver disease was in urgent need of a transplant. While on the waiting list, she developed hepatic encephalopathy, a condition where toxins began to take their toll on her brain. Before long, her liver started to shut up all together and doctors rushed to save her life. With time ticking away, their only option was a liver that had already been turned down by other hospitals. It was considered to be in bad shape – not only it contained a cyst caused by a parasit infection, but its previous owner was a recently deceased 93 years old woman. The organ was old by transplant standards, particularly for a recipient so much more young. But with no other organs available and little other choice, the doctors went ahead with the transplant. Remarkably, the operation, which took place in 2008 in Turkey, was a success – the young recipient survived, and six years later gave birth to a healthy baby girl. On her daughter’s first birthday, the woman had turned 26 and had just celebrated her liver’s one-hundredth birthday.///END of Part ONE ///
Not much of us will ever know what it’s like to have a liver as old as our great-grandparents. But remarkably some of our organs have the capacity to outlive us, while others age far more quickly. One of the curiosities of longevity research is that your actual age appears to be less important than you might expect. In fact, researchers tend to be more interested in the discrepancy between your chronologic age and your biologic age. These two numbers may be linked, but they don’t always match up. We are all well aware that a lifetime of healthy eating and lack of sleep will age us prematurely. Research shows that the complex mix of genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors that determine how quickly age our bodies does not affect all our organs in equal measure. So, while we may have the youthful appearance of a 38 years old, our kidneys might have the shrivelled appearance of one from a 61 years old. Equally we could have all the wrinkles and hair loss of an 80-year-old, but still have the heating heart of a 40 year old. ///END of Part TWO ///
Accurately estimating the biological age of any organ is not a simple task: it really requires detailed examination of the organ’s function, tissue structure, cellular make up and genetic health to assess it accurately. The transplant data also raises questions about whether there is an upper limit at the lifespan of certain organs. The liver, for example, is well known for its regenerative capabilities, and patients who have had till two thirds of their liver surgically removed can find the organ almost completely regrows to its previous size within a year. Some researchers have suggested that nonagenarians are a largely untapped pool of potential liver donors, citing several successful transplants in recent years. Others are monitoring a select club of transplant patients whose the livers have turned one hundred several decades before they will.
Any number of lifestyle factors can influence our complex patterns of ageing. “What we eat and how we eat it, how we sleep and when we sleep – all these things can impact our organs in varying ways that we don’t fully understand”.///END of Part THREE ///
At the microscopic level, many tissues completely regenerate over time, but the rate at which they do so varies hugely. A red blood cell circulates in your veins and arteries for an average of four months, while those cells braving the rough and tumble of your gut need to be replaced after just a little days. At the other extreme, most brain cells, or neurons, are not replaced as we age, meaning they are generally as old as the body himself. “If you are a cardioager, make sure you watch your bad cholesterol, get your heart checking, exercises,” “For a metabolic ager, watch regimen; liver agers, drink less alcohol, etc.” For now, however, many scientists are focussed on extending the healthy lifespan – healthspan – of elderly people. Wherever many differences there may be in the way each organ ages, it makes sense to look after them all. They are still interconnected systems and the ageing of one will inevitably affect the others. “If you have inflammation in your joints, that inflammation is going to impact in your brain and your heart as well,” “Every different organ has a different ageing trajectory, but it’s all interrelated”. ///END of the TEXT ///

Pas très facile ... Normal ! C'est un , la correction sera en ligne le lundi 27 Juillet 2020. THE FORCE will be with You!



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de joe39, postée le 19-07-2020 à 18:58:32 (S | E)
Good evening dear Here4u
After racking my brain I send you hereunder
the outcome of my thorough search of mistakes, made
by your student, ready to be checked.
20 mistakes.
It was a desperate situation. A 19-YEAR-OLD TURKISH - 1 woman with liver disease was in urgent need of a transplant. While on the waiting list, she developed hepatic encephalopathy, a condition where toxins began to take their toll on her brain. Before long, her liver started to shut DOWN ALTOGETHER - 2 and doctors rushed to save her life.
With time ticking away, their only option was a liver that had already been turned down by other hospitals. It was considered to be in bad shape – not only it contained a cyst caused by a PARASITIC - 3 infection, but its previous owner was a recently deceased 93-YEAR-OLD 4 woman. The organ was old by transplant standards, particularly for a recipient so much YOUNGER- 5. But with no other organs available and little other choice, the doctors went ahead with the transplant. Remarkably, the operation, which took place in 2008 in Turkey, was a success – the young recipient survived, and six years later gave birth to a healthy baby girl. On her daughter’s first birthday, the woman had turned 26 and had just celebrated her liver’s one-hundredth birthday.///END of Part ONE ///
Not much of us will ever know what it’s like to have a liver as old as our great-grandparents. But remarkably some of our organs have the capacity to outlive us, while others age far more quickly.
One of the curiosities of longevity research is that your actual age appears to be less important than you might expect. In fact, researchers tend to be more interested in the discrepancy between your CHRONOLOGICAL- 6 age and your biologic age. These two numbers may be linked, but they don’t always match up. We are all well aware that a lifetime of UNHEALTHY- 7 eating and lack of sleep will age us prematurely.
Research shows that the complex mix of genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors that determine how quickly OUR BODIES AGE-8 does not affect all our organs in equal measure.
So, while we may have the youthful appearance of a 38-YEAR-OLD, our kidneys might have the shrivelled appearance of one from a 61-YEAR-OLD. Equally we could have all the wrinkles and hair loss of an 80-year-old, but still have the BEATING - 9 heart of a FORTY-YEAR-OLD. ///END of Part TWO ///
Accurately estimating the biological age of any organ is not a simple task: it really requires detailed examination of the organ’s function, tissue structure, cellular make up and genetic health to assess it accurately. The transplant data also raises questions about whether there is an upper limit ON - 10 the lifespan of certain organs. The liver, for example, is well known for its regenerative capabilities, and patients who have had UP TO - 11 two thirds of their liver surgically removed can find the organ almost completely REGROWN-12 to its previous size within a year. Some researchers have suggested that nonagenarians are a largely untapped pool of potential liver donors, citing several successful transplants in recent years. Others are monitoring a select club of transplant patients whose (the-13 ) livers have turned one hundred several decades before they will.
Any number of lifestyle factors can influence our complex patterns of ageing. “What we eat and how we eat it, how we sleep and when we sleep – all these things can impact our organs in varying ways that we don’t fully understand”.///END of Part THREE ///
At the microscopic level, many tissues completely regenerate over time, but the rate at which they do so varies hugely. A red blood cell circulates in your veins and arteries for an average of four months, while those cells braving the rough and tumble of your gut need to be replaced after just a FEW - 14 days.At the other extreme, most brain cells, or neurons, are not replaced as we age, meaning they are generally as old as the body himself.
“If you are a CARDIO AGER, - 15 make sure you watch your bad cholesterol, get your heart CHECKED, EXERCISE, 16” “For a metabolic ager, watch regimen; liver agers, drink less alcohol, etc. For now, however, many scientists are FOCUSED - 17 on extending the healthy LIFE SPAN –HEALTH SPAN 18– of elderly people.HOWEVER - 19 many differences there may be in the way each organ ages, it makes sense to look after them all. They are still nterconnected systems and the ageing of one will inevitably affect the others.
“If you have inflammation in your joints, that inflammation is going to impact ON- 20 your brain and your heart as well,” “Every different organ has a different ageing trajectory, but it’s all interrelated”. ///END

I thank you for your nice excerpt and I hope you have a great week.
Take care.
So long.
Joe39



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de taiji43, postée le 19-07-2020 à 19:19:52 (S | E)
Dear Here4U
Back to Brittany from a nice hamlet...

I put on , one part of the text. I havejust finished the whole text but I have to reread it . I stop this laborious correction because I’ve racked my brain enough for today (dimanche 19)

NOW A FEW DAYS LATER (Mardi 21)
READY TO BE CORRECTED


It was a desperate situation. A 19 -YEAR-old turkish woman with liver disease was in urgent need OF TRANSPLANT. While on the waiting list, she developed hepatic encephalopathy, a condition where or IN WHICH toxins began to take their TOLLS on her brain.

Before long, her liver started to shut DOWN ENTIRELY and doctors rushed to save her life. With time ticking away, their only option was a liver that had already been turned down by other hospitals. It was considered to be in bad shape or IN POOR CONDITION– not only DID it CONTAIN (inversion après not only )a cyst caused by a PARASITICAL infection, but its previous owner was a recently deceased 93-YEAR- old woman.

The organ was old IN ACCORDANCE WITH transplant standards, particularly for a recipient so much YOUNGER. But with no other organs available and NO OTHER ALTERNATIVE, the doctors went ahead with the transplant. Remarkably, the operation, which took place in 2008 in Turkey, was a success – the young recipient survived, and six years later gave birth to a healthy baby girl. On her daughter’s first birthday, the woman had turned 26 and had just celebrated her liver’s one-hundredth birthday.///END of Part ONE ///

Not MANY OF us will ever know what it’s like to have a liver as old as our great-grandparents. But remarkably some or A FEW of our organs have the capacity to outlive us, while others age far more quickly. One of the curiosities of longevity research is that your REAL (réel) age appears to be less important than you might expect.

In fact, researchers tend to be more interested in the discrepancy between your CHRONOLOGICAL age and your BIOLOGICALc age. These two numbers may be linked, but they don’t always match up. We are all well aware that a lifetime of UNHEALTHY eating and lack of sleep will age us prematurely. Research shows that the complex mix of genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors that determine how quickly OUR BODIES AGE WHILE ARE not AFFECTING all our organs in equal measure.

So, while we may have the youthful appearance of a 38-YEAR- old, our kidneys might have the shrivelled appearance of A 61-YEAR- old. Equally we could have all the wrinkles and hair loss of AN 80-year-old,(an devant eighty) but still have the BEATING heart of a 40- year old. ///END of Part TWO ///

Accurately estimating the biological age of any organ is not a simple task: it really requires detailed examination of the organ’s function, tissue structure, cellular make up and genetic health to assess it accurately. TRANSPLANT data also raises questions about whether there is an upper limit at the lifespan of certain organs.

The liver, for example, is well known for its regenerative capabilities, and patients who HAD had UP TO (jusqu'à) two thirds of their liver surgically removed can find the organ almost completely GROWN or REGENERATED to its previous size within a year

Others are mon A FEW researchers have suggested that nonagenarians are a largely untapped pool of potential liver donors, citing several successful transplants in recent years.Others are monitoring a select club of TRANSPLANTED patients whose LIVERS (pas de the) have BEEN TURNED DOWN one hundred, several decades before they will.
A FEW NUMBERS of lifestyle factors can influence our complex patterns of ageing. “What we eat and how we eat it, how we sleep and when we sleep – all these things can impact our organs in varying ways that we don’t fully understand”.///END of Part THREE ///

At the microscopic level, many tissues completely regenerate over time, but the rate at which they do so varies hugely. A red blood cell circulates in your veins and arteries for an average of four months, while those cells braving the rough and tumble of your gut need to be replaced after just A FEW days. At the other extreme, most brain cells, or neurons, are not replaced as we age, meaning they are generally as old as the body himself. “If you are a CARDIO-AGER, make sure you CHECK your bad cholesterol, get your heart checking, exercises,” “For a metabolic- AGER watch regimen or DIET (qui est moins formel) FOR liver agers , drink less alcohol, etc.”

For now, however, many scientists are focussed(Ok or Focused) on extending the healthy lifespan – healthspan – of elderly people. Wherever (partout où) THERE WERE many differences there may be in the way each organ ages, it makes sense to look after them all. They are still???(mot pas nécessaire???)interconnected systems and the ageing of one will inevitably affect the others. “If you have inflammation in your joints, that inflammation is going to impact in your brain and your heart as well,” “Every different organ has a different ageing trajectory, but it’s all interrelated”. ///END



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de here4u, postée le 22-07-2020 à 00:30:00 (S | E)
Hello !

Certains m’ont dit que ce RYB était long et difficile ... Difficile, je le savais ... plus que d’habitude, je ne crois pas ....
Quant à la longueur, c’est vrai aussi .... En conséquence, je m’engage à ne pas dépasser 25 lignes les autres fois ...
À ma décharge, remanier un/ des textes sans trahir les idées, ni trop tronquer l’histoire, ne pas enlever tous les éléments qui vous aideront à comprendre,
et c’est un travail ÉNORME ( et très difficile ... mais c’est mon problème... )

LA SOLUTION ? Je vous l’ai donnée dès le début ... NE FAITES LE TRAVAIL QU’EN PARTIE ! Je préfère la qualité à la quantité...
Vous pouvez ( devez ? ) vous arrêter à ce qui vous est nécessaire ... et possible ...
Donc, n’allez pas au-delà de vos limites parce que je «  propose » pour ceux qui peuvent , veulent ....
mais suis très satisfaite de vous lorsque vous me rendez un passage d‘exercice que VOUS pensez trop court,
Dans tous les cas, VOUS DISPOSEZ de votre choix et je m’en réjouis ....
( Ce pourrait même être intéressant de ne pas tous travailler à fond le même passage ! )
Je ne fais pas un éloge à la « paresse » mais au ménagement, ... aux vacances aussi !
IT’S UP TO YOU!



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de alpiem, postée le 22-07-2020 à 11:12:13 (S | E)
hello everybody and coaches


un copier-coller assez problematique, I hope I will manage to make it! always to do it the more confortable and rapidly as possible.?

It was a desperate situation. A 19 YEAR-OLD turkish woman with liver disease was in urgent need of a transplant. While on the waiting list, she developed hepatic encephalopathy, a condition where toxins began to take their toll on her brain. Before long, her liver started to shut up ALTOGETHER and doctors rushed to save her life. With time ticking away, their only option was a liver that had already been turned down by other hospitals. It was considered to be in bad shape ? not only DID it CONTAIN a cyst caused by a parasit infection, but its previous owner was a recently deceased 93 YEAR-OLD woman. The organ was old by transplant standards, particularly for a recipient SO MUCH YOUNGER. But with no other organs available and little other choice, the doctors went ahead with the transplant. Remarkably, the operation, which took place in 2008 in Turkey, was a success ? the young recipient survived, and six years later gave birth to a healthy baby girl. On her daughter's first birthday, the woman had turned 26 and had just celebrated her liver's one-hundredth birthday.///END of Part ONE ///

Not MANY of us will ever know what it's like to have a liver as old as our great-grandparents. But remarkably some of our organs have the capacity to outlive us, while others age far more quickly. One of the curiosities of longevity research is that your actual age appears to be less important than you might expect. In fact, researchers tend to be more interested in the discrepancy between your chronologic age and your biologic age. These two numbers may be linked, but they don't always match up. We are all well aware that a lifetime of UNHEALTHY eating and lack of sleep will age us prematurely. Research shows that the complex mix of GENETICS,lifestyle and environmental factors that determine how quickly our bodies ARE AGING does not affect all our organs in equal measure. So, while we may have the youthful appearance of a 38 YEAR-OLD, our kidneys might have the shrivelled appearance of one from a 61 YEAR-OLD. Equally we could have all the wrinkles and hair loss of an 80 year-old, but still have thE BEATING heart of a 40 YEAR-OLD ///END of Part TWO ///

Accurately estimating the biological age of any organ is not a simple task: it really requires detailed examination of the organ's function, tissue structure, cellular make up and genetic health to assess it accurately. The transplant data also raises questions about whether there is an upper limit at the lifespan of certain organs. The liver, for example, is well known for its regenerative capabilities, and patients who have had till two thirds of their liver surgically removed can find the organ almost completely REGROWN
to its previous size within a year. Some researchers have suggested that nonagenarians are a largely untapped pool of potential liver donors, citing several successful transplants in recent years. Others are monitoring a select club of TRANSPLANTED patients whose( ) livers have turned one hundred AND several decades before they will.
Any number of lifestyle factors can influence our complex patterns of ageing. ?What we eat and how we eat it, how we sleep and when we sleep ? all these things can impact our organs in varying ways that we don't fully understand?.///END of Part THREE ///

At the microscopic level, many tissues completely regenerate over time, but the rate at which they do so varies hugely. A red blood cell circulates in your veins and arteries for an average of four months, while those cells braving the rough and tumble of your gut need to be replaced after just a little days. At the other extreme, most brain cells, or neurons, are not replaced as we age, meaning they are generally as old as the body himself. ?If you are a cardioager, make sure you watch your bad cholesterol, get your heart CHECKED, EXERCISE,? ?For a metabolic ager, watch regimen; liver agers, drink less alcohol, etc.? For now, however, many scientists are focussed on extending the healthy lifespan ? healthspan ? of elderly people. HOWEVER many differences there may be in the way each organ ages, it makes sense to look after them all. They are still interconnected systems and the ageing of one will inevitably affect the others. ?If you have inflammation in your joints, that inflammation is going to impact (iXn) your brain and your heart as well,? ?Every different organ has a different ageing trajectory, but THEY'RE all interrelated?. ///END of the TEXT ///



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de diaksan, postée le 22-07-2020 à 14:20:36 (S | E)
Hello everyone
I hope your well!
the pandemic has damaged everything on the world but in west Africa are better than Europa !
but all the world will get the consequence !
we pray the to take of that pandemic on the world

I'm sorry for my english I'm a beguiners!
have a good time
cordially
DIAKIT



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de maxwell, postée le 22-07-2020 à 17:03:27 (S | E)
READY TO BE CORRECTED


Hello Here4U
That was long but interesting, as usual . I didn't count the number of corrections but it looks as though I've corrected many more than 20 mistakes. Did I add some? We'll see...

It was a desperate situation. A 19-YEAR-old [T]urkish woman with liver disease was in urgent need of a transplant. While on the waiting list, she developed hepatic encephalopathy, a condition where toxins began to take their toll on her brain. Before long, her liver started to shut DOWN ALTOGETHER and doctors rushed to save her life. With time ticking away, their only option was a liver that had already been turned down by other hospitals. It was considered to be in bad shape – not only DID it CONTAIN a cyst caused by a PARASITIC infection, but its previous owner was a recently deceased 93-YEAR-old woman. The organ was old by transplant standards, particularly for a so much YOUNGER RECIPIENT. But with no other ORGAN available and little other choice, the doctors went ahead with the transplant. Remarkably, the operation, which took place in 2008 in Turkey, was a success – the young recipient survived, and six years later gave birth to a healthy baby girl. On her daughter’s first birthday, the woman had turned 26 and had just celebrated her liver’s one-hundredth birthday.///END of Part ONE ///

Not SO MANY of us will ever know what it’s like to have a liver as old as our great-grandparents. But remarkably some of our organs have the ABILITY to outlive us, while others age far more quickly. One of the curiosities of longevity research is that your actual age appears to be less important than you might expect. In fact, researchers tend to be more interested in the discrepancy between your CHRONOLOGICAL age and your BIOLOGICAL age. These two numbers may be linked, but they don’t always match up. We are all well aware that a lifetime of UNHEALTHY eating and lack of sleep will age us prematurely. Research shows that the complex mix of genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors that determine how quickly our bodies AGE does not affect all our organs in equal measure. So, while we may have the youthful appearance of a 38-YEAR-old, our kidneys might have the shrivelled appearance of one from a 61-YEAR-old. Equally we could have all the wrinkles and hair loss of an 80-year-old, but still have the BEATING heart of a 40-year-old. ///END of Part TWO ///

Estimating ACCURATELY the biological age of any organ is not a simple task: it really requires detailed examination of the organ’s function, tissue structure, cellular MAKEUP and genetic health to assess it accurately. The transplant data also RAISE questions about whether there is an upper limit TO the lifespan of certain organs. The liver, for example, is well known for its regenerative ABILITIES, and patients who have had UP TO two thirds of their liver surgically removed can find the organ almost completely REGROWN to its previous size within a year. Some researchers have suggested that nonagenarians are a largely untapped pool of potential liver donors, citing several successful transplants in recent years. Others are monitoring a select club of TRANSPLANTED patients whose [] livers have turned one HUNDRED several decades before they will.
Any number of lifestyle factors can influence our complex patterns of ageing. “What we eat and how we eat it, how we sleep and when we sleep – all these things can impact our organs in VARIED ways that we don’t fully understand”.///END of Part THREE ///

At A microscopic level, many tissues completely regenerate over time, but the rate at which they do so varies hugely. A red blood cell circulates in your veins and arteries for an average of four months, while those cells braving the rough-and-tumble of your gut need to be replaced after just a FEW days. At the other extreme, most brain cells, or neurons, are not replaced as we age, meaning they are generally as old as the body ITSELF. “If you are a cardioager, make sure you watch your bad cholesterol, get your heart CHECKED, DO exercises,” “For a metabolic ager, watch regimen; FOR liver agers, drink less alcohol, etc.” For now, however, many scientists are FOCUSED on extending the healthy lifespan – healthspan – of elderly people. NO MATTER HOW many differences there may be in the way each organ ages, it makes sense to look after them all. They are still interconnected systems and the ageing of one will inevitably affect the others. “If you have inflammation in your joints, that inflammation is going to impact [] your brain and your heart as well,” “Every different organ has a different ageing trajectory, but it’s all interrelated”. ///END of the TEXT ///



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de here4u, postée le 22-07-2020 à 19:14:31 (S | E)
hello diaksan!

It's sure that a exercise must be quite difficult for a beginner...
Don't worry, I'll correct your little text anyway, but I'd like you to read it again and again, as you have forgotten a few words, I suppose!

Take care.



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de maya92, postée le 23-07-2020 à 15:36:55 (S | E)
Hello Here4u,

It was a desperate situation. A 19-YEAR old Turkish woman with A liver disease was in urgent need of a transplant. While on the waiting list, she developed hepatic encephalopathy, a condition where toxins began to take their toll on her brain. Before long, her liver started to shut DOWN ALTOGETHER and doctors rushed to save her life. With time ticking away, their only option was a liver that had already been turned down by other hospitals. It was considered to be in bad FORM – not only it contained a cyst caused by a PARASITIC infection, but its previous owner was a recently deceased 93-YEAR-OLD woman. The organ was old by transplant standards, particularly for a recipient so much YOUNGER. But with no other organs available and little other choice, the doctors went ahead with the transplant. Remarkably, the operation, which took place in 2008 in Turkey, was a success – the young recipient survived, and six years later gave birth to a healthy baby girl. On her daughter’s first birthday, the woman had turned 26 and had just celebrated her liver’s one-hundredth birthday.///END of Part ONE ///
Not MANY of us will ever know what it’s like to have a liver as old as our great-grandparents. But remarkably some of our organs have the capacity to outlive us, while others age far more quickly. One of the curiosities of longevity research is that your actual age appears to be less important than you might expect. In fact, researchers tend to be more interested in the discrepancy between your CHRONOLOGICAL age and your BIOLOGICAL age. These two numbers may be linked, but they don’t always match up. We are all well aware that a lifetime of UNHEALTHY eating and lack of sleep will age us prematurely. Research shows that the complex mix of genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors that determine how quickly our bodies AGE does not affect all our organs in equal measure. So, while we may have the youthful appearance of a 38-YEAR old, our kidneys might have the SHRIVELED appearance of one from a 61-YEAR old. Equally we could have all the wrinkles and hair loss of an 80-year-old, but still have the BEATING heart of a 40 year old. ///END of Part TWO ///

TO ESTIMATE ACCURATELY the biological age of any organ is not a simple task: it really requires detailed examination of the organ’s function, tissue structure, cellular MAKE-UP and genetic health to assess it accurately. The transplant data also RAISE questions about whether there is an upper limit at the life span of certain organs. The liver, for example, is well known for its regenerative capabilities, and patients who have had UP TO two thirds of their liver surgically removed can find the organ almost completely REGROWN to its previous size within a year. Some researchers have suggested that nonagenarians are a largely untapped pool of potential liver donors, citing several successful transplants in recent years. Others are monitoring a select club of TRANSPLANTED patients whose () livers have turned one hundred several decades before they will.
Any number of lifestyle factors can influence our complex patterns of ageing. “What we eat and how we eat it, how we sleep and when we sleep – all these things can impact our organs in VARIOUS ways that we don’t fully understand”.///END of Part THREE ///
At A microscopic level, many tissues completely regenerate over time, but the rate at which they do so varies hugely. A red blood cell circulates in your veins and arteries for an average of four months, while those cells braving the rough- and-tumble of your gutS need to be replaced after just a FEW days. At the other extreme, most brain cells, or neurons, are not replaced as we age, meaning they are generally as old as the body ITSELF. “If you are a cardio-ager, make sure you watch your bad cholesterol, get your heart CHECKED, DO exercises,” “For a metabolic ager, watch regimen; liver agers, drink less alcohol, etc.” For now, however, many scientists are FOCUSED on extending the healthy lifespan – health-span – of elderly people. NO MATTER HOW many differences there may be in the way each organ ages, it makes sense to look after them all. They are still interconnected systems and the ageing of one will inevitably affect the others. “If you have AN inflammation in your joints, that inflammation is going to impact () your brain and your heart as well,” “Every different organ has a different ageing trajectory, but it’s all interrelated”. ///END of the TEXT ///

HORRIBLEMENT DIFFICILE... Normal ! C'est un , la correction sera en ligne le lundi 27 Juillet 2020. THE FORCE will be with You!

Devilishly exhausting again … Thank u nevertheless …



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de here4u, postée le 23-07-2020 à 18:30:09 (S | E)


Don't worry, Maya (and others...) the exercise is "devilishly exhausting" for me to correct, too... (but I still find it interesting...) (Served me right! ) BUT, I have already found the following RYB and after a lot of work, it will have around 20 lines... not more! I promise !



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de chocolatcitron, postée le 24-07-2020 à 00:51:28 (S | E)
Rack your brains and help! /74
Message de here4u posté le 10-07-2020 à 18:01:04 (S | E | F) lundi 27 Juillet
Hello, my dear Here4u, thanks for this very interesting topic !
Hi dear Hard-working Friends,

FINISHED! I’ll take the first part, if my translation isn’t as good as it should be!

This time my Student has chosen what might look like a news item but may in fact be the starting point of an important research which will change our great-grandkids' lives forever... Who knows? Fingers crossed...

PLEASE, HELP MY STUDENT. HE NEEDS YOU. In spite of his efforts, he has left 20 mistakes in this text...

Here is my very serious work, I must sometimes be wrong, as I ‘m not an English native woman: it took me a long time, I enjoyed myself on this pleasant topic! But it finished, right now !

MY LOOKING FOR THE 20 MISTAKES:
It was a desperate situation. 1 A 19-YEAR-OLD 2 TURKISH woman with liver disease was in urgent need of a transplant. While on the waiting list, she developed hepatic encephalopathy, a condition where toxins began to take their toll on her brain. Before long, her liver started to 3 shut DOWN 4 ALTOGETHER and doctors rushed to save her life. With time ticking away, their only option was a liver that had already been turned down by other hospitals. It was considered to be in bad shape – not only 5 DID it 6 CONTAIN a cyst caused by a 7 PARASITIC infection, but its previous owner was a recently deceased 1(bis) 93-YEAR-OLD woman. The organ was old by transplant standards, particularly for a recipient so much 8 YOUNGER. But with no other organs available and little other choice, the doctors went ahead with the transplant. Remarkably, the operation, which took place in 2008 in Turkey, was a success – the young recipient survived, and six years later gave birth to a healthy baby girl. On her daughter’s first birthday, the woman had turned 26 and had just celebrated her liver’s one-hundredth birthday.///END of Part ONE ///

9 FEW of us will ever know what it’s like to have a liver as old as our great-grandparents. But remarkably some of our organs have the capacity to outlive us, while others age far more quickly. One of the curiosities of longevity research is that your actual age appears to be less important than you might expect. In fact, researchers tend to be more interested in the discrepancy between your 10 CHRONOLOGICAL age and your biologic age. These two numbers may be linked, but they don’t always match up. We are all well aware that a lifetime of 11 UNHEALTHY eating and lack of sleep will age us prematurely. Research shows that the complex mix of genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors that determine how quickly 12 our bodies ‘S AGE does not affect all our organs in equal measure. So, while we may have the youthful appearance of a 1(ter) 38-YEAR-old, our kidneys might have the shrivelled appearance of one from a 1(quarte) 61-YEAR-old. Equally we could have all the wrinkles and hair loss of an 80-year-old, but still have the 13 BEATING heart of a 40-year-old. ///END of Part TWO ///

Accurately estimating the biological age of any organ is not a simple task: it really requires detailed examination of the organ’s function, tissue structure, cellular make up and genetic health to assess it accurately. The transplant data also raises questions about whether there is an upper limit 14 OF the lifespan of certain organs. The liver, for example, is well known for its regenerative capabilities, and patients who have had till two thirds of their liver surgically removed can find the organ almost completely 15 REGROWN to its previous size within a year. Some researchers have suggested that nonagenarians are a largely untapped pool of potential liver donors, citing several successful transplants in recent years. Others are monitoring a select club of transplant patients whose the livers have turned one hundred several decades before they will.
Any number of lifestyle factors can influence our complex patterns of ageing. “What we eat and how we eat it, how we sleep and when we sleep – all these things can impact our organs in varying ways that we don’t fully understand”.///END of Part THREE ///

At the microscopic level, many tissues completely regenerate over time, but the rate at which they do so varies hugely. A red blood cell circulates in your veins and arteries for an average of four months, while those cells braving the rough and tumble of your gut need to be replaced after just a 16 FEW days. At the other extreme, most brain cells, or neurons, are not replaced as we age, meaning they are generally as old as the body 17 ITSELF.“If you are a cardioager, make sure you watch your bad cholesterol, get your heart 18 CHECKED exercises,” “For a metabolic ager, watch regimen; liver agers, drink less alcohol, etc.” For now, however, many scientists are focussed on extending the healthy lifespan – healthspan – of elderly people. 19 DESPITE many differences there may be in the way each organ ages, it makes sense to look after them all. They are still interconnected systems and the ageing of one will inevitably affect the others. “If you have inflammation in your joints, that inflammation is going to impact 20 ON your brain and your heart as well,” “Every different organ has a different ageing trajectory, but it’s all interrelated”. ///END of the TEXT ///


MY EXPLANATIONS:
1=> A 19-year-old = adjectif qualificatif ne prend pas de s. Idem pour 1(bis), 1(ter), 1(quarte), 1(quinte). Il faut mettre aussi les tirets entre les mots !
2 => TURKISH woman = les noms de nationalité prennent une majuscule en anglais.
3 => shut up = fermer définitivement, faire taire qqn. Shut DOWN = fermer définitivement, éteindre, couper, faire la sourde oreille. Là, je dirai « dysfonctionner ».
4 =>all together = tous ensemble. ALTOGETHER = NB : altogether = en tout, dans le plus simple appareil.
5 => not only it contained = est faux ! Not only DID it contain = avec « not only » il y a inversion sujet/verbe. Le temps étant au prétérit, j’ai rajouté did.
6 =>CONTAIN a cyst caused by : forcément, après l’auxiliaire, did, le verbe est conjugué à l’infinitif incomplet.
7 =>PARASITIC infection, un parasite = parasitic. Parasite infection = une infection parasitaire. A parasit n’existe pas en anglais.
1 (bis) 93 a -YEAR-old woman.
8 => more young n’existe pas : faute de grammaire (énorme) comparatif.= YOUNGER
9 Not much (avec indénombrable)= FEW of us, not so many, not many… pas beaucoup de/peu de + dénombrable. Us = people, dénombrable.
10 => chronologic (n’existe pas). CHRONOLOGICAL age = âge chronologique.
11 => healthy = contresens, non ? Je mettrai : UNHEALTHY eating = ne pas manger sainement induit un vieillissement prématuré.
12 => how quickly our bodies’ AGE does = comment cela agit rapidement sur l’âge de notre corps, cela n’impacte pas tous nos organes à la même vitesse.
1 (ter) => 38- -YEAR-old,
1 (quarte) => 61 -YEAR-old.
13 => heating = chauffant. BEATING heart = cœur battant.
1 (quinte) = 40-year- old. (Il manque les tirets !!!)
14 => « at » non, je dirais the upper limit of sth.= le plafond, la limite maximale à/de qqch.
15 => regrown = participe passé.
16 => just a FEW days= comptable !
17 => the body ITSELF (pas himself), itself = le corps n’est pas la personne. Il est juste une enveloppe, donc pronom neutre.
18 => checking = non ! CHECKED = faire vérifier par un cardiologue votre cœur. Ce n’est pas le cœur qui se vérifie lui-même.
19 => DESPITE many differences = despite + nom/groupe nominal.
20 => to impact on = impacter, avoir un effet sur…


MY TRANSLATION:
C’était une situation désespérée. Une femme turque de 19 ans, hépatique avait le besoin urgent d’une greffe. Alors qu’elle était sur la liste d’attente, elle a développé une encéphalopathie hépatique, une étape où les toxines ont commencé à faire des ravages dans son cerveau. Peu de temps après, son foie a commencé à dysfonctionner complètement et les médecins se sont précipités pour lui sauver la vie. Devant l’urgence face au temps qui s’écoule, leur seule option était un foie qui avait déjà été refusé par d’autres hôpitaux. Il a été considéré comme étant en mauvais état - non seulement il contenait un kyste causé par une infection parasitaire, mais son propriétaire précédent était une femme récemment décédée de 93 ans. L’organe était vieux selon les normes de transplantation, en particulier pour un receveur beaucoup plus jeune. Mais sans autres organes disponibles et peu d’autres choix, les médecins ont opté pour la greffe. Fait remarquable, l’opération, qui a eu lieu en 2008 en Turquie, a été un succès – la jeune receveuse a survécu, et six ans plus tard a donné naissance à une petite fille en bonne santé. Le jour du premier anniversaire de sa fille, la femme avait eu 26 ans et venait de fêter le centième anniversaire de son foie. ///FIN de la partie ONE///

Peu d’entre nous sauront au grand jamais ce que c’est que d’avoir un foie aussi vieux que nos arrière-grands-parents. Mais remarquablement certains de nos organes ont la capacité de nous survivre, tandis que d’autres vieillissent beaucoup plus rapidement. Une des curiosités de la recherche sur la longévité est que votre âge réel semble être moins important que vous le penseriez. En fait, les chercheurs ont tendance à s’intéresser davantage à l’écart entre votre âge chronologique et votre âge biologique. Ces deux chiffres peuvent être liés, mais ils ne correspondent pas toujours. Nous sommes tous bien conscients qu’une vie de mauvaise alimentation et de manque de sommeil va nous vieillir prématurément. La recherche montre que le mélange complexe de facteurs génétiques, de mode de vie et environnementaux qui déterminent la vitesse à laquelle notre corps vieillit n’impacte pas tous nos organes à la même vitesse. Ainsi, alors que nous pouvons avoir l’apparence jeune de quelqu’un âgé de 38 ans, nos reins pourraient avoir l’apparence ratatinée d’une personne de 61ans De même, nous pourrions avoir toutes les rides et la perte de cheveux d’une octogénaire, mais avoir encore le cœur battant d’un quadragénaire. ///FIN de la partie DEUX///

Estimer avec précision l’âge biologique de n’importe quel organe n’est pas une mince affaire : il faut vraiment examiner en détail la fonction de l’organe, la structure tissulaire, la composition cellulaire et la santé génétique pour l’évaluer avec précision. Les données sur la transplantation soulèvent également des questions quant à savoir s’il y a une limite supérieure à la durée de vie de certains organes. Le foie, par exemple, est bien connu pour ses capacités régénératrices, et les patients qui ont eu jusqu’à deux tiers de leur foie enlevé chirurgicalement peuvent trouver l’organe presque complètement repoussé à sa taille précédente au bout d’ un an. Certains chercheurs ont suggéré que les nonagénaires sont un bassin largement inexploité de donneurs potentiels de foie, citant plusieurs greffes réussies ces dernières années. D’autres surveillent un club sélect de patients transplantés dont le foie a dépassé cent et plusieurs décennies avant qu’ils ne le retransplanteront. ( ???) Un certain nombre de facteurs liés au mode de vie peuvent influencer nos modèles complexes de vieillissement. « Ce que nous mangeons et comment nous le mangeons, comment nous dormons et quand nous dormons - toutes ces choses peuvent avoir un impact sur nos organes de différentes façons que nous ne comprenons pas pleinement ». ///FIN de la partie TROIS///

Au niveau microscopique, de nombreux tissus se régénèrent complètement au fil du temps, mais la vitesse à laquelle ils le font varie énormément. Un globule rouge circule dans vos veines et artères pendant une moyenne de quatre mois, tandis que ces cellules bravant les aspérités et le transit de votre intestin doivent être remplacés après seulement quelques jours. À l’autre extrême, la plupart des cellules du cerveau, ou neurones, ne sont pas remplacés quand nous vieillissons, ce qui signifie qu’ils sont généralement aussi vieux que le corps lui-même. « Si vous avez un cœur plus âgé, assurez-vous de regarder votre mauvais cholestérol, faire vérifier votre cœur, pratiquer des exercice », « pour un métabolique plus âgé, regarder le régime alimentaire; les plus âgés du foie, de boire moins d’alcool, etc. » Pour l’instant, cependant, de nombreux scientifiques se concentrent sur l’allongement de la durée de la vie saine – le bassin de santé – des personnes âgées. Malgré les nombreuses différences qu’il peut y avoir dans la façon dont chaque organe vieillit, il est logique de s’occuper de tous. Ce sont encore des systèmes interconnectés et que le vieillissement de l’un affectera inévitablement les autres organes. « Si vous avez une inflammation dans vos articulations, cette inflammation va impacter votre cerveau et votre cœur donc, » « Chaque organe différent a une trajectoire de vieillissement différente, mais tout est lié ». ///FIN DU TEXTE ///


Here is the MEGA FORCE to help you for marking, my dear Here4u!...
Have a very sweet week, each of you, however don’t forget to take care of yourselves.
See you soon.



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de here4u, postée le 27-07-2020 à 23:18:36 (S | E)
Hello, Dear Friends ...

Voici votre correction... Le texte était long, très long et pas si facile que je le pensais. Bravo donc à ceux qui ont relevé le défi ! Vous l'avez tous fait avec courage et brio !
J'aurai, bien sûr, BESOIN de vous pour le travail de FOLLOW-UP! et je sens, et crains avoir bien du mal à trouver des volontaires nombreux ... but remember, "The More, The Merrier..."

Research suggests some parts of the body age faster than others and may even outlive their owners. Could understanding this better help us to live longer?

It was a desperate situation. A 19-year-old Turkish woman (1) with liver disease was in urgent need of a transplant. While on the waiting list, she developed hepatic encephalopathy, a condition where toxins began to take their toll on her brain. Before long, her liver started to shut down altogether (2)(3) and doctors rushed to save her life. With time ticking away, their only option was a liver that had already been turned down by other hospitals. It was considered to be in bad shape – not only did it contain (4) a cyst caused by a parasitic (5) infection, but its previous owner was a recently deceased 93-year-old woman(1). The organ was old by transplant standards, particularly for a recipient so much younger (6). But with no other organs available and little other choice, the doctors went ahead with the transplant. Remarkably, the operation, which took place in 2008 in Turkey, was a success – the young recipient survived, and six years later gave birth to a healthy baby girl. On her daughter’s first birthday, the woman had turned 26 and had just celebrated her liver’s one-hundredth birthday.///END of Part ONE ///
Few of us (7) will ever know what it’s like to have a liver as old as our great-grandparents. But remarkably some of our organs have the capacity to outlive us, while others age far more quickly. One of the curiosities of longevity research is that your actual age appears to be less important than you might expect. In fact, researchers tend to be more interested in the discrepancy between your chronological age and your biological age. (8) These two numbers may be linked, but they don’t always match up. We are all well aware that a lifetime of unhealthy (9) eating and lack of sleep will age us prematurely. Research shows that the complex mix of genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors that determine how quickly our bodies age does not affect all our organs in equal measure. So, while we may have the youthful appearance of a 38-year-old, (1) our kidneys might have the shrivelled appearance of one from a 61-year-old(1). Equally we could have all the wrinkles and hair loss of an 80-year-old, but still have the beating heart (10) of a 40-year-old.///END of Part TWO ///
Accurately estimating the biological age of any organ is not a simple task: it really requires detailed examination of the organ’s function, tissue structure, cellular make up and genetic health to assess it accurately. The transplant data also raises questions about whether there is an upper limit on (11) the lifespan of certain organs. The liver, for example, is well known for its regenerative capabilities, and patients who have had up to (12) two thirds of their liver surgically removed can find the organ almost completely regrows to its previous size within a year. Some researchers have suggested that nonagenarians are a largely untapped pool of potential liver donors, citing several successful transplants in recent years. Others are monitoring a select club of transplant patients whose livers(13) have turned one hundred several decades before they will.
Any number of lifestyle factors can influence our complex patterns of ageing. “What we eat and how we eat it, how we sleep and when we sleep – all these things can impact our organs in varying ways that we don’t fully understand”.///END of Part THREE ///
At the microscopic level, many tissues completely regenerate over time, but the rate at which they do so varies hugely. A red blood cell circulates in your veins and arteries for an average of four months, while those cells braving the rough and tumble of your gut need to be replaced after just a few days(14). At the other extreme, most brain cells, or neurons, are not replaced as we age, meaning they are generally as old as the body itself (15). “If you are a cardioager, make sure you watch your bad cholesterol, get your heart checked,(17) exercise(18),” “For a metabolic ager, watch diet (16); liver agers, drink less alcohol, etc.” For now, however, many scientists are focussed on extending the healthy lifespan – healthspan – of elderly people. However many differences (19) there may be in the way each organ ages, it makes sense to look after them all. They are still interconnected systems and the ageing of one will inevitably affect the others. “If you have inflammation in your joints, that inflammation is going to impact on (20)your brain and your heart as well,” “Every different organ has a different ageing trajectory, but it’s all interrelated”. ///END of the TEXT ///

(1) A 19 years old turkish woman : double erreur de mon élève … => « A 19-year-old Turkish woman »: 19-year-old parce que « year » est en position d’adjectif et reste donc invariable ; idem pour : a recently deceased 93-year-old woman/ a 38-year-old,/ a 61-year-old/ an 80-year-old/ … Il s’était bien amusé à multiplier les risques … et les fautes !

Turkish woman parce que les mots de nationalités (adjectifs et noms ) prennent des majuscules en anglais. Ne pas en mettre est une faute.
(2) (3) Encore deux erreurs consécutives : to shut up all together. To « shut up »= se taire Mais => an organ shuts down= cesser de fonctionner…
Ne pas confondre «all together»= tous ensemble et «altogether»= Lien internet
= totally.
(4) – not only it contained a cyst caused by a parasit infection, but…:
not only it contained est faux. Une négation en début de phrase entraîne forcément une inversion du sujet.
(5) by a parasit infection est faux: Lien internet
?
– not only did it contain a cyst caused by a parasitic infection, but …
«a parasit» est un nom ; l’adjectif est «a parasitic infection».
(6) so much more young.=> ... a recipient so much younger
(7) Not much of us était faux parce que "us"= forme complément de «we» est dénombrable pluriel. => not many of us … était possible, mais n’était pas le meilleur choix ici. => « Few of us… »
(8) your chronological age and your biological age. ATTENTION à la construction des DEUX adjectifs.
(9) health=> healthy : la santé/ en bonne santé … Le contraire = préfixe « un- » = UNHEALTHY;
(10) "To heat=> heating" (verbe régulier)= chauffer
Lien internet
est fort différent de "to beat, I beat, beaten" Lien internet

(**) lifestyle and environmental factors that determine how quickly our bodies age : attention ! C’est une interrogative INDIRECTE (pas d"inversion sujet-verbe).
(11), limit on the lifespan of/ to set a limit ON SOMETHING… fixer une limite à qqch/ quelqu’un ….
(12) «have had up to»; antériorité par rapport au prétérit de narration => past perfect.
Up to:= until/ as far as/ jusqu’à (pour une quantité ; jusqu’à pour une distance) pour un temps, préférer : Until/ till.
(13) patients whose livers= les foies appartiennent aux patients => pronom relatif de possession=> WHOSE + objet possédé sans article.
(15) just a little days : Days est un dénombrable pluriel=> just a few days
16) « Body » est un mot neutre => as old as the body itself.
(17) get your heart checked: to get something done : Lien internet

(18) Ici, «exercise» est un verbe=> to exercise (physical exercises).
(19) Wherever many differences; wherever= où que ce soit … Lien internet
=> No matter how many differences/ However many differences ….
(20) to impact on something/ to have an impact ON something.

Voilà ! Je compte sur quelques bonnes volonté pour ne pas laisser Choco prendre seule la "responsabilité" du Follow-up work!
Encore BRAVO et de votre excellent travail !



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de maxwell, postée le 29-07-2020 à 20:10:32 (S | E)
FINISHED
Hello!
Je suis volontaire pour la première partie, peut-être +

Part I:
It was a desperate situation. A 19-year-old Turkish woman with liver disease was in urgent need of a transplant. While on the waiting list, she developed hepatic encephalopathy, a condition where toxins began to take their toll on her brain. Before long, her liver started to shut down altogether and doctors rushed to save her life. With time ticking away, their only option was a liver that had already been turned down by other hospitals. It was considered to be in bad shape – not only did it contain a cyst caused by a parasitic infection, but its previous owner was a recently deceased 93-year-old woman. The organ was old by transplant standards, particularly for a recipient so much younger. But with no other organs available and little other choice, the doctors went ahead with the transplant. Remarkably, the operation, which took place in 2008 in Turkey, was a success – the young recipient survived, and six years later gave birth to a healthy baby girl. On her daughter’s first birthday, the woman had turned 26 and had just celebrated her liver’s one-hundredth birthday.

C'était une situation désespérée. Une jeune femme turque de 19 ans atteinte d'une maladie du foie avait besoin urgemment d'une transplantation. Alors qu'elle était sur la liste d'attente, elle développa une encéphalopathie hépatique, une maladie où les toxines commençaient à faire des ravages dans son cerveau. Bientôt, son foie cessa de fonctionner complètement et les docteurs se précipitèrent pour la sauver.
Le temps s'écoulant, leur seule option était un foie qui avait déjà été refusé par d'autres hôpitaux. On le considéra en mauvais état - non seulement il contenait un kyste causé par une infection parasitaire, mais en plus, son propriétaire était une femme de 93 ans récemment décédée. L'organe était vieux, selon les normes de la transplantation,
surtout pour un bénéficiaire aussi jeune. Mais en l'absence d'autres organes disponibles et avec si peu d'alternatives, les docteurs entreprirent la greffe. Chose étonnante, l'opération, qui eut lieu en 2008 en Turquie, fut couronnée de succès -la jeune bénéficiaire survécut et six années plus tard, donna naissance à une petite fille en pleine santé. Le jour du premier anniversaire de sa fille, la femme qui avait alors 26 ans, venait juste de fêter le centième anniversaire de son foie.

Part II:
Few of us will ever know what it’s like to have a liver as old as our great-grandparents. But remarkably some of our organs have the capacity to outlive us, while others age far more quickly. One of the curiosities of longevity research is that your actual age appears to be less important than you might expect. In fact, researchers tend to be more interested in the discrepancy between your chronological age and your biological age. These two numbers may be linked, but they don’t always match up. We are all well aware that a lifetime of unhealthy eating and lack of sleep will age us prematurely. Research shows that the complex mix of genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors that determine how quickly our bodies age does not affect all our organs in equal measure. So, while we may have the youthful appearance of a 38-year-old, our kidneys might have the shrivelled appearance of one from a 61-year-old. Equally we could have all the wrinkles and hair loss of an 80-year-old, but still have the beating heart (10) of a 40-year-old.

Peu d'entre nous ne sauront ce que c'est que d'avoir un foie aussi vieux que nos arrière-grands-parents. Mais il est intéressant de noter que certains de nos organes ont la capacité de nous survivre, tandis que d'autres vieillissent bien plus rapidement. Une des curiosités de la recherche sur la longévité est que votre âge réel semble être moins important que ce à quoi vous pourriez vous attendre. En fait, les chercheurs ont tendance à s'intéresser davantage à l'écart entre votre âge chronologique et votre âge biologique. Ces deux grandeurs ont beau être liées, elles ne vont pas toujours de pair. Nous savons tous parfaitement qu'une vie passée à manger de façon malsaine et à manquer de sommeil nous fera vieillir prématurément. Les recherches montrent que la combinaison de facteurs génétiques, environnementaux et ceux liés au mode de vie, qui détermine la vitesse à laquelle notre corps vieillit n'affecte pas tous les organes dans la même mesure. Aussi, alors qu'on peut avoir l'apparence jeune d'une personne de 38 ans, nos reins pourraient avoir l'aspect ratatiné d'une personne de 61 ans. De même, on pourrait avoir toutes les rides et la perte de cheveux d'une personne de 80 ans, mais toujours le coeur battant d'une personne de 40 ans.

Part III:
Accurately estimating the biological age of any organ is not a simple task: it really requires detailed examination of the organ’s function, tissue structure, cellular make up and genetic health to assess it accurately. The transplant data also raises questions about whether there is an upper limit on the lifespan of certain organs. The liver, for example, is well known for its regenerative capabilities, and patients who have had up to two thirds of their liver surgically removed can find the organ almost completely regrows to its previous size within a year. Some researchers have suggested that nonagenarians are a largely untapped pool of potential liver donors, citing several successful transplants in recent years. Others are monitoring a select club of transplant patients whose livers have turned one hundred several decades before they will.
Any number of lifestyle factors can influence our complex patterns of ageing. “What we eat and how we eat it, how we sleep and when we sleep – all these things can impact our organs in varying ways that we don’t fully understand”


Estimer avec précision l'âge biologique d'un organe quelconque n'est pas tâche aisée : cela demande réellement un examen détaillé de la fonction, la structure du tissu, la composition cellulaire et la santé génétique de l'organe pour l'évaluer précisément. Les données sur les transplantations soulèvent aussi des questions relatives à l'existence d'un plafond à la durée de vie de certains organes. Le foie, par exemple, est bien connu pour ses capacités régénératives et les patients qui ont subi l'ablation de leur foie jusqu'aux deux tiers peuvent constater que l'organe retrouve presque entièrement sa taille précédente en une année. Certains chercheurs suggèrent que les nonagénaires forment un réservoir de donneurs potentiels de foie largement inexploité, citant plusieurs greffes réussies ces dernières années. D'autres chercheurs surveillent un club restreint de patients transplantés dont le foie est devenu centenaire plusieurs décennies avant qu'eux-mêmes ne le deviennent. Un grand nombre de facteurs liés au mode de vie peut/peuvent influencer nos phénomènes complexes de vieillissement. "Ce que nous mangeons et la façon dont nous mangeons, notre durée de sommeil et l'heure à laquelle nous dormons - tous ces facteurs peuvent avoir un impact sur nos organes de différentes façons que nous ne comprenons pas entièrement."

Part IV:
At the microscopic level, many tissues completely regenerate over time, but the rate at which they do so varies hugely. A red blood cell circulates in your veins and arteries for an average of four months, while those cells braving the rough and tumble of your gut need to be replaced after just a few days. At the other extreme, most brain cells, or neurons, are not replaced as we age, meaning they are generally as old as the body itself. “If you are a cardioager, make sure you watch your bad cholesterol, get your heart checked, exercise,” “For a metabolic ager, watch diet; liver agers, drink less alcohol, etc.” For now, however, many scientists are focussed on extending the healthy lifespan – healthspan – of elderly people. However many differences there may be in the way each organ ages, it makes sense to look after them all. They are still interconnected systems and the ageing of one will inevitably affect the others. “If you have inflammation in your joints, that inflammation is going to impact on your brain and your heart as well,” “Every different organ has a different ageing trajectory, but it’s all interrelated”

Au niveau microscopique, de nombreux tissus se régénèrent complètement avec le temps, mais la vitesse à laquelle ils le font varie énormément. Un globule rouge circule dans les veines et les artères pendant quatre mois en moyenne, alors que les cellules qui bravent le chahut de l'intestin doivent être remplacées au bout de seulement quelques jours. A l'autre extrême, la plupart des cellules du cerveau, ou neurones, ne sont pas remplacées avec l'âge, ce qui signifie qu'elles sont en général aussi vieilles que le corps lui-même. Si vous êtes quelqu'un dont les cellules du coeur ont tendance à être âgées, assurez-vous que vous surveillez bien votre mauvais cholestérol, faites-vous examiner le coeur et faites des exercices physiques." "Pour ceux qui ont des problèmes de métabolisme, surveillez votre alimentation. Pour les vieillissants du foie, buvez moins d'alcool, etc..." Pour l'heure, cependant, de nombreux scientifiques se concentrent sur l'allongement de la durée de vie en bonne santé des personnes âgées. Aussi nombreuses que soient les différences dans la manière dont chaque organe vieillit, cela a du sens de s'occuper de tous. Ils constituent quand même des systèmes interconnectés et le vieillissement de l'un affectera inévitablement les autres. "Si vous avez une inflammation dans vos articulations, cette inflammation va avoir un impact sur votre cerveau et votre coeur également." "Chaque organe a une trajectoire de vieillissement différente mais tout est interdépendant.



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de here4u, postée le 30-07-2020 à 05:31:55 (S | E)
à Max aussi !

N.oubliez pas, le F up W n’est jamais pressé ... Vous pouvez choisir le(s) passage(s) qui vous (ont)/ a le plus gênés ... ( Parts 3 and 4 are the most difficult ones...)



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de chocolatcitron, postée le 30-07-2020 à 11:08:35 (S | E)
Hello !

J'espère avoir amélioré mon précédent travail :

It was a desperate situation. A 19-year-old Turkish woman (1) with liver disease was in urgent need of a transplant. While on the waiting list, she developed hepatic encephalopathy, a condition where toxins began to take their toll on her brain. Before long, her liver started to shut down altogether (2)(3) and doctors rushed to save her life. With time ticking away, their only option was a liver that had already been turned down by other hospitals. It was considered to be in bad shape – not only did it contain (4) a cyst caused by a parasitic (5) infection, but its previous owner was a recently deceased 93-year-old woman(1). The organ was old by transplant standards, particularly for a recipient so much younger (6). But with no other organs available and little other choice, the doctors went ahead with the transplant. Remarkably, the operation, which took place in 2008 in Turkey, was a success – the young recipient survived, and six years later gave birth to a healthy baby girl. On her daughter’s first birthday, the woman had turned 26 and had just celebrated her liver’s one-hundredth birthday.///END of Part ONE ///


C'était une situation désespérée. Une femme turque de 19 ans, hépatique avait le besoin urgent d'une greffe. Alors qu'elle était sur la liste d'attente, elle a développé une encéphalopathie hépatique, une condition préalable où les toxines ont commencé à faire des ravages dans son cerveau. Peu de temps après, son foie a commencé à dysfonctionner complètement et les médecins se sont précipités pour lui sauver la vie. Devant l'urgence face au temps qui s'écoule, leur seule option était un foie qui avait déjà été refusé par d'autres hôpitaux. Il fut considéré comme étant en mauvais état - non seulement il contenait un kyste causé par une infection parasitaire, mais son propriétaire précédent était une femme âgée de 93 ans, récemment décédée. L'organe était vieux selon les normes de transplantation, en particulier pour un receveur beaucoup plus jeune. Mais sans autres organes disponibles et peu d'autres choix, les médecins ont opté pour la greffe. Fait remarquable, l'opération, qui a eu lieu en 2008 en Turquie, fut un succès, la jeune receveuse a survécu, et six ans plus tard a donné naissance à une petite fille en bonne santé. Le jour du premier anniversaire de sa fille, la femme avait dépassé 26 ans et venait de fêter le centième anniversaire de son foie. ///FIN de la partie ONE///

Have a very sweet week! Stay safe...
See you soon.



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de here4u, postée le 31-07-2020 à 18:16:49 (S | E)
Hello, Dear Friends!

Rendons hommage et FELICITONS chaudement nos deux "volontaires" ...
Le travail était difficile et extrêmement long ! BRAVISSIMO à tous les deux !s

Research suggests some parts of the body age faster than others and may even outlive their owners. Could understanding this better help us to live longer?

It was a desperate situation. A 19-year-old Turkish woman with liver disease was in urgent need of a transplant. While on the waiting list, she developed hepatic encephalopathy, a condition where toxins began to take their toll on her brain. Before long, her liver started to shut down altogether and doctors rushed to save her life. With time ticking away, their only option was a liver that had already been turned down by other hospitals. It was considered to be in bad shape – not only did it contain a cyst caused by a parasitic infection, but its previous owner was a recently deceased 93-year-old woman. The organ was old by transplant standards, particularly for a recipient so much younger. But with no other organs available and little other choice, the doctors went ahead with the transplant. Remarkably, the operation, which took place in 2008 in Turkey, was a success – the young recipient survived, and six years later gave birth to a healthy baby girl. On her daughter’s first birthday, the woman had turned 26 and had just celebrated her liver’s one-hundredth birthday.

C'était une situation désespérée. Une femme turque de 19 ans, hépatique avait le besoin urgent d'une greffe. Alors qu'elle était sur la liste d'attente, elle développa une encéphalopathie hépatique, une condition préalable* maladie où les toxines commencèrent à faire des ravages dans son cerveau. Peu de temps après, son foie a commencé à dysfonctionner complètement et les médecins se sont précipités pour lui sauver la vie. Devant l'urgence face au temps qui s'écoule, leur seule option était un foie qui avait déjà été refusé par d'autres hôpitaux. Il était considéré comme étant en mauvais état - non seulement il contenait un kyste causé par une infection parasitaire, mais son propriétaire précédent était une femme âgée de 93 ans, récemment décédée. L'organe était vieux selon les normes de transplantation, en particulier pour un receveur beaucoup plus jeune. Mais sans autres organes disponibles et peu d'autres choix, les médecins ont opté pour la greffe. Fait remarquable, l'opération, qui a eu lieu en 2008 en Turquie, fut un succès, la jeune receveuse a survécu, et six ans plus tard a donné naissance à une petite fille en bonne santé. Le jour du premier anniversaire de sa fille, la femme avait dépassé 26 ans et venait de fêter le centième anniversaire de son foie.

* pas d'article indéfini devant un groupe nominal en apposition.
à condition : Lien internet
Bravo, Choco! C'est très BIEN !


C'était une situation désespérée. Une jeune femme turque de 19 ans atteinte d'une maladie du foie avait besoin urgemment(I think it's ugly!) d'une transplantation en urgence/ d'urgence. Alors qu'elle était sur la liste d'attente, elle développa une encéphalopathie hépatique, une maladie où les toxines commençaient à faire des ravages dans son cerveau. Bientôt, son foie cessa de fonctionner complètement et les docteurs se précipitèrent pour la sauver.TTB
Le temps s'écoulant, leur seule option était un foie qui avait déjà été refusé par d'autres hôpitaux. On le considérait en mauvais état - non seulement il contenait un kyste causé par une infection parasitaire, mais en plus, son propriétaireNON! son possesseur était une femme de 93 ans récemment décédée. L'organe était vieux, selon les normes de la transplantation,
surtout pour un bénéficiaire aussi jeune. Mais en l'absence d'autres organes disponibles et avec si peu d'alternatives, les docteurs entreprirent la greffe. Chose étonnante, l'opération, qui eut lieu en 2008 en Turquie, fut couronnée de succès - la jeune bénéficiaire survécut et six années plus tard, donna naissance à une petite fille en pleine santé. Le jour du premier anniversaire de sa fille, la femme qui avait alors 26 ans, venait juste de fêter le centième anniversaire de son foie.

Bravo Max! Tu as très bien compris, et traduit ce texte !

Few of us will ever know what it’s like to have a liver as old as our great-grandparents. But remarkably some of our organs have the capacity to outlive us, while others age far more quickly. One of the curiosities of longevity research is that your actual age appears to be less important than you might expect. In fact, researchers tend to be more interested in the discrepancy between your chronological age and your biological age. These two numbers may be linked, but they don’t always match up. We are all well aware that a lifetime of unhealthy eating and lack of sleep will age us prematurely. Research shows that the complex mix of genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors that determine how quickly our bodies age does not affect all our organs in equal measure. So, while we may have the youthful appearance of a 38-year-old, our kidneys might have the shrivelled appearance of one from a 61-year-old. Equally we could have all the wrinkles and hair loss of an 80-year-old, but still have the beating heart of a 40-year-old.

Peu d’entre nous sauront au grand jamais (maladroit !) ce que c’est que d’avoir un foie aussi vieux que nos arrière-grands-parents. Mais remarquablement certains de nos organes ont la capacité de nous survivre, tandis que d’autres vieillissent beaucoup plus rapidement. Une des curiosités de la recherche sur la longévité est que notre âge réel semble être moins important que nous pourrions le penser. En fait, les chercheurs ont tendance à s’intéresser davantage à l’écart entre notre âge chronologique et notre âge biologique. Ces deux chiffres peuvent être liés, mais ils ne correspondent pas toujours. Nous sommes tous bien conscients qu’une vie de mauvaise alimentation et de manque de sommeil va nous vieillir prématurément. La recherche montre que le mélange complexe de facteurs génétiques, de mode de vie et de facteurs environnementaux qui détermine [ Sujet= le mélange] la vitesse à laquelle notre corps vieillit n’impacte pas tous nos organes à la même vitesse. Ainsi, alors que nous pouvons avoir l’apparence jeune de quelqu’un âgé de 38 ans, nos reins pourraient avoir l’apparence ratatinée ( )d’une personne de 61 ans. De même, nous pourrions avoir toutes les rides et la perte de cheveux d’un octogénaire, mais avoir encore le rythme cardiaque d’un quadragénaire.
BRAVO, Choco. - N'hésite pas à t'éloigner parfois du mot à mot pour plus d'authenticité ... (ex: coeur battant=> rythme cardiaque)

Peu d'entre nous ne sauront ce que c'est que d'avoir un foie aussi vieux que nos arrière-grands-parents. Mais il est intéressant de noter que certains de nos organes ont la capacité de nous survivre, tandis que d'autres vieillissent bien plus rapidement. Une des curiosités de la recherche sur la longévité est que notre âge réel semble être moins important que ce à quoi nous pourrions nous attendre. En fait, les chercheurs ont tendance à s'intéresser davantage à l'écart entre notre âge chronologique et notre âge biologique. Ces deux grandeurs ont beau être liées, elles ne vont pas toujours de pair. Nous savons tous parfaitement qu'une vie passée à manger de façon malsaine et à manquer de sommeil nous fera vieillir prématurément. Les recherches montrent que la combinaison de facteurs génétiques, environnementaux et ceux liés au mode de vie, qui détermine la vitesse à laquelle notre corps vieillit n'affecte pas tous les organes dans la même mesure. Aussi, alors que l'on peut avoir l'apparence jeune d'une personne de 38 ans, nos reins pourraient avoir l'aspect ratatiné d'une personne de 61 ans. De même, on pourrait avoir toutes les rides et la perte de cheveux d'une personne de 80 ans, mais toujours le coeur battant d'une personne de 40 ans.
La "perte des cheveux" dont vous parlez tous les deux me gêne un peu ... je préférerais "l'alopécie", ou encore plus clair pour tous : "la calvitie" ...
Bravo, Max ! Ta traduction est à la fois juste et assez élégante !

Accurately estimating the biological age of any organ is not a simple task: it really requires detailed examination of the organ’s function, tissue structure, cellular make up and genetic health to assess it accurately. The transplant data also raises questions about whether there is an upper limit on the lifespan of certain organs. The liver, for example, is well known for its regenerative capabilities, and patients who have had up to two thirds of their liver surgically removed can find the organ almost completely regrows to its previous size within a year. Some researchers have suggested that nonagenarians are a largely untapped pool of potential liver donors, citing several successful transplants in recent years. Others are monitoring a select club of transplant patients whose livers have turned one hundred several decades before they will.
Any number of lifestyle factors can influence our complex patterns of ageing. “What we eat and how we eat it, how we sleep and when we sleep – all these things can impact our organs in varying ways that we don’t fully understand”.

Estimer avec précision l’âge biologique de n’importe quel organe n’est pas une mince affaire : il faut vraiment examiner en détail la fonction de l’organe, sa structure tissulaire, sa composition cellulaire et sa santé génétique pour l’évaluer avec précision. Les données sur la transplantation soulèvent également des questions quant à savoir s’il y a une limite supérieure à la durée de vie de certains organes. Le foie, par exemple, est bien connu pour ses capacités régénératrices, et les patients qui ont eu jusqu’à deux tiers de leur foie enlevé chirurgicalement peuvent trouver l’organe (ils le cherchent?) presque complètement repoussé (ça fait trop "plante"...) à sa taille précédente au bout d’un an. Certains chercheurs ont suggéré que les nonagénaires sont un bassin largement inexploité de donneurs potentiels de foie, citant plusieurs greffes réussies ces dernières années. D’autres surveillent/ contrôlent un club sélect de patients transplantés dont le foie a dépassé cent et plusieurs décennies avant qu’ils ne le retransplanteront. ( ???) (j'aurais bien mis du rouge ... Très "beau" contre-sens, ma Choco !) Un certain nombre de facteurs liés au mode de vie peuvent influencer nos modèles complexes de vieillissement. « Ce que nous mangeons et comment nous le mangeons, comment nous dormons et quand nous dormons - toutes ces choses peuvent avoir un impact sur nos organes de différentes façons que nous ne comprenons pas pleinement ».
Très très bien Choco! sauf ton magnifique cs! Bravo de ce beau travail !

En corrigeant mon doublon, (qui n'en n'était même pas un ... - je suis capable de corriger le même texte deux fois en faisant des remarques différentes, bien que dans le même sens ... ), j'ai eu une pop up intempestive qui m'a fait tout perdre à nouveau ... (Je suis maudite sur ce devoir ! Donc, je vais enregistrer très souvent .... et "nettoierai" après !)

Estimer avec précision l'âge biologique d'un organe quelconque n'est pas tâche aisée : cela demande réellement un examen détaillé de la fonction, la structure du tissu, la composition cellulaire et la santé génétique de l'organe pour l'évaluer précisément. Les données sur les transplantations soulèvent aussi des questions relatives à l'existence d'un plafond à la durée de vie (lourd) de certains organes. Le foie, par exemple, est bien connu pour ses capacités régénératives et les patients qui ont subi l'ablation de leur foie jusqu'aux deux tiers peuvent constater que l'organe retrouve presque entièrement sa taille précédente en une année. * Certains chercheurs suggèrent que les nonagénaires forment un réservoir de donneurs potentiels de foie largement inexploité, citant plusieurs greffes réussies ces dernières années. D'autres chercheurs surveillent un club restreint de patients transplantés dont le foie est devenu centenaire plusieurs décennies avant qu'eux-mêmes ne le deviennent . Un grand nombre de facteurs liés au mode de vie peut/peuvent influencer nos phénomènes complexes de vieillissement. "Ce que nous mangeons et la façon dont nous mangeons, notre durée de sommeil et l'heure (peut-être un peu trop précis - "le moment où ..."?) à laquelle nous dormons - tous ces facteurs peuvent avoir un impact sur nos organes de différentes façons que nous ne comprenons pas entièrement." Bravo Max ! C'est très bien compris et traduit ...
* j'aurais utilisé "presque entièrement régénéré".

At the microscopic level, many tissues completely regenerate over time, but the rate at which they do so varies hugely. A red blood cell circulates in your veins and arteries for an average of four months, while those cells braving the rough and tumble of your gut need to be replaced after just a few days. At the other extreme, most brain cells, or neurons, are not replaced as we age, meaning they are generally as old as the body itself. “If you are a cardioager, make sure you watch your bad cholesterol, get your heart checked, exercise,” “For a metabolic ager, watch diet; liver agers, drink less alcohol, etc.” For now, however, many scientists are focussed on extending the healthy lifespan – healthspan – of elderly people. However many differences there may be in the way each organ ages, it makes sense to look after them all. They are still interconnected systems and the ageing of one will inevitably affect the others. “If you have inflammation in your joints, that inflammation is going to impact on your brain and your heart as well,” “Every different organ has a different ageing trajectory, but it’s all interrelated”.

Au niveau microscopique, de nombreux tissus se régénèrent complètement au fil du temps, mais la vitesse à laquelle ils le font varie énormément. Un globule rouge circule dans nos veines et artères pendant une moyenne de quatre mois, tandis que ces cellules bravant les aspérités et le transit de votre intestin doivent être remplacéEs après seulement quelques jours. À l’autre extrême, la plupart des cellules du cerveau, les neurones, ne sont pas remplacés quand nous vieillissons, ce qui signifie qu’ils elles sont généralement aussi vieux vieilles que le corps lui-même. « Si vous "avez un cœur plus âgé" (avez un faiblesse cardiaque), assurez-vous de regarder surveiller votre mauvais cholestérol, de faire vérifier votre cœur, pratiquer des faites de l'exercice », « pour un métabolique plus âgé, regarder faites attention à le votre régime alimentaire; les plus âgés du foie ceux qui ont le foie malade, de boire moins d’alcool, etc. » Pour l’instant, cependant, de nombreux scientifiques se concentrent sur l’allongement de la durée de la vie saine en bonne santéle bassin de santé la durée de vie en bonne santé – des personnes âgées. Malgré les nombreuses différences qu’il peut y avoir dans la façon dont chaque organe vieillit, il est logique de s’occuper prendre soin de tous. Ce sont encore des systèmes interconnectés et que le vieillissement de l’un affectera inévitablement les autres organes. « Si vous avez une inflammation dans vos des articulations, cette inflammation va également impacter votre cerveau et votre cœur donc, » « Chaque organe différent a une trajectoire de vieillissement différente, mais tout est lié ».
Très très bien, Choco pour ce paragraphe extrêmement difficile. Il te manquait juste le concept de "organ ager" ... Bravo pour ton courage et la performance de la persévérance !

Au niveau microscopique, de nombreux tissus se régénèrent complètement avec le temps, mais la vitesse à laquelle ils le font varie énormément. Un globule rouge circule dans les veines et les artères pendant quatre mois en moyenne, alors que les cellules qui bravent le chahut de l'intestin doivent être remplacées au bout de seulement quelques jours. A l'autre extrême, la plupart des cellules du cerveau, ou neurones, ne sont pas remplacées avec l'âge, ce qui signifie qu'elles sont en général aussi vieilles que le corps lui-même. Si vous êtes quelqu'un dont les cellules du coeur ont tendance à être âgées, assurez-vous que vous surveillez bien votre mauvais cholestérol, faites-vous examiner le coeur et faites des de l'exercices physiques." "Pour ceux qui ont des problèmes de métabolisme, surveillez votre alimentation. Pour les vieillissants du foie, buvez moins d'alcool, etc..." Pour l'heure, cependant, de nombreux scientifiques se concentrent sur l'allongement de la durée de vie en bonne santé des personnes âgées. Aussi nombreuses que soient les différences dans la manière dont chaque organe vieillit, cela a du sens de s'occuper de tous les autres. Ils constituent quand même des systèmes interconnectés et le vieillissement de l'un affectera inévitablement les autres. "Si vous avez une inflammation dans vos des articulations, cette inflammation va avoir un impact sur votre cerveau et votre coeur également." "Chaque organe a une trajectoire de vieillissement différente mais tout est interdépendant.

Bravissimo, Max ! D'excellentes trouvailles et aussi beaucoup de courage et de persévérance pour ce texte si long (et difficile...) !


If you are a cardioager, : vous avez tous les deux lu "If you have a cardioager ..."
Il s'agissait ici de distinguer les personnes qui ont une faiblesse portant sur UN ORGANE, par rapport aux autres personnes qui sont "à risques" à cause d'un autre organe : cardioager= faiblesse du coeur ; a metabolic ager est une personne qui a des problèmes de métabolisme ( "Le métabolisme est l'ensemble des réactions chimiques qui se déroulent à l'intérieur d'un être vivant pour lui permettre notamment de se maintenir en vie, de se reproduire, de se développer et de répondre aux stimuli de son environnement.") ; a liver ager est une personne qui a des problèmes de foie ... etc. J'ai l'impression que vous aviez compris l'idée, mais en français ... c'était TRÈS difficile ...

- "the rough and tumble":
Lien internet

Lien internet

Je crois que je mettrais simplement : les cellules qui affrontent "le tumulte/ le chahut de notre intestin ..."

- Jamais entendu "le bassin de santé" (ni trouvé ...) pour le sens de "health span":
("Un bassin de santé" en français n'a rien à voir ... « Un bassin de santé s’organise autour d’un pôle hospitalier qui draine des flux préférentiels de patients aux caractéristiques et aux comportements homogènes », donc pas du tout le sens du texte ...
Il nous faut utiliser une périphrase: la durée/ l'espérance de vie en bonne santé

Encore BRAVO, et je vous avoue que ... je suis bien contente et soulagée d'avoir enfin terminé ce travail !

J'ai corrigé mon "doublon" ... (qui n'en était même pas un car je suis capable de corriger deux fois le même texte en mettant des remarques différentes, mais dans le même esprit quand même, bien-sûr ! )
J'espère que c'est vraiment la FIN de cette correction !



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de here4u, postée le 02-08-2020 à 22:58:08 (S | E)
Hello Dears!

Hallelujah , hallelujah The Follow up Work is finished!



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de here4u, postée le 03-08-2020 à 00:02:06 (S | E)
Hum hum ... Hello Lucile, Help, please...

On dirait que la dernière partie de la correction du Follow up Work a un bug de police. J'ai réussi à diminuer la grosseur en "bidouillant" ... mais ce n'est pas encore l'idéal and the Machine won't obey me!
in advance...



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de lucile83, postée le 03-08-2020 à 09:09:25 (S | E)
Helloooo
Il y avait une balise en trop que j'ai bien sûr effacée.
Pas de souci ❤️
Bonne journée



Réponse : Rack your brains and help! /74 de here4u, postée le 03-08-2020 à 23:46:16 (S | E)
Lucile ! et en plus j'ai "bégayé" sur un paragraphe ...

I'm losing my mind... Je crois avoir besoin de vrai repos ...




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