Créer un test
Connectez-vous !

Cliquez ici pour vous connecter
Nouveau compte
4 millions de comptes créés

100% gratuit !
[Avantages]


- Accueil
- Accès rapides
- Aide/Contact
- Livre d'or
- Plan du site
- Recommander
- Signaler un bug
- Faire un lien



Publicités :




Recommandés :
- Traducteurs gratuits
- Jeux gratuits
- Nos autres sites
   

Rack your brains and help!/70

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Rack your brains and help!/70
Message de here4u posté le 12-05-2020 à 18:40:19 (S | E | F)
Hello, Dear Friends,

Voici votre nouvel exercice Rack Your Brains!

PLEASE, HELP MY STUDENT... He has left 20 mistakes in this text… - some are recurring! (They should be corrected IN CAPITAL LETTERS, please!)

Cet exercice est un et la correction sera en ligne le mercredi 27 mai, tard. ENJOY!
Ce texte contient 20 fautes qu'il convient de corriger ...

Navigating busy roads, public transport and trips to the shops are all in a day's work for a guide dog.
But with most training centres closed and roads quite, there are concerns visually impaired people may have to wait longer to get a dog. Volunteers, known as boarders, are instead using video lessons to keep training to go around the house and garden during the coronavirus lockdown. Guide dog instructor Amy John said they were going "above and beyond". From when they start their training at about 12 months old, guide dogs live with their boarder and are taken every day to a Guide Dogs training centre to learn essential skills. But when social distancing measures came in, the training centres had to close, leaving it up to the volunteers to try to train the dogs from their living room and garden.
"They can again go out for their daily walks, or for a free run, and that's being invaluable for the moment," said Amy. With cafes and restaurants closed and less traffic on the roads, Amy said the kittens were not able to get used to many of the daily challenges guide dogs have to face. "We take our dogs into shops and cafes, we use public transport regularly to get them used to be on buses, but at the moment all that is completely out," she said. /// End of part 1 /// Amy and her dog are making videos of exercises and then sending them to the boarders, who are practising them with the dogs and sending back footage for feedback. They may look like games, but the tricks teach essential skills, such as hand touched and putting their heads on seats, which are important to keep their owner safety and provide reassurance. "They're so used to go out and about while they are with us, so it's important to keep their little minds go," Amy said. Near the end of their training, which normally takes 16 weeks, the dogs are "matching" with a visually impaired or blind owner, with factors like the dog's speed taken into account. But this has been paused until the lockdown will end. "It was real shame, we did have some dogs that were nearly at the end of their training and were ready to be matched," Amy said.
Actually there are visually impaired people on the waiting list for a guide dog. But even with the volunteers' efforts,
with dogs unable to practice essential skills like guiding across busy roads and on to trains and buses, owners may have to wait a little longer. /// End of part 2 /// "It will be challenging for the dogs, it will mean that when they do come back into training with us, and we are able to start training them again, it might just take that little bit longer," Amy said. "We will have to work quite hard to making sure that the dogs are really confident before they are matched with a client." It is not just the guide dogs in the making being kept busy during lockdown - some old dogs are been taught new tricks by their owners. While visually impaired people may have to wait longer for their dogs, the efforts of the boarders were making a difference. "A significant number of people with sight loose live alone, and the current restrictions can leave them feeling cut from their usual support networks of friends and family," she said. "Many are not online, so Guide Dogs staff are making regular phone calls to check on the well-being of every single service user, helping them accessing the practical support they need. "As an organisation, we are currently planning for such time as services can safely resume, and our plans are reviewed daily, based on the latest advice from the government." ///End of the Text ///


May THE FORCE be with You!


Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/70 de magie8, postée le 14-05-2020 à 15:02:29 (S | E)
bonjour
Bon pour correction merci OUF j'arrête je vais voir les autres exercices

Navigating busy roads, public transport and trips to the shops are all in a day's work for a guide dog.
But with most training centres closed and roads quite, there are concerns visually impaired people may have to wait longer to get a dog. Volunteers, known as boarders, are instead using video lessons to keep training GOING around the house and garden during the coronavirus lockdown. Guide dog instructor Amy John said they were going "above and beyond". From when they start their training at about 12 months old, guide dogs live with their boarder and are taken every day to THE Guide Dogs training centre to learn essential skills. But when social distancing measures came in, the training CENTRE had to close, leaving it up to the volunteers to try to train the dogs from their living ROOMS and GARDENS .
"They can STILL go out for their daily walks, or for a free run, and that's BEEN invaluable for the moment," said Amy. With cafes and restaurants closed and less traffic on the roads, Amy said the PUPPIES were not able to get used to many of the daily challenges guide dogs have to face. "We take our dogs into shops and cafes, we use public transport regularly to get them used to BEING on buses, but at the moment all that is completely OFF ," she said. /// End of part 1 /// Amy and her dog are making videos of exercises and then sending them to the boarders, who are practising them with the dogs and sending back footage for feedback. They may look like games, but the tricks teach essential skills, such as hand TOUCHING and putting their heads on seats, which are important to keep their owner SAFE and provide reassurance. "They're so used to GOING out and about while they are with us, so it's important to keep their little minds go," Amy said. Near the end of their training, which normally takes 16 weeks, the dogs are "MATCHED" with a visually impaired or blind owner, with factors like the dog's speed taken into account. But this has been paused until the lockdown ()ENDS . "It was A real shame, we did have some dogs that were nearly at the end of their training and were ready to be matched," Amy said.
Actually there are visually impaired people on the waiting list for a guide dog. But even with the volunteers' efforts,
with dogs unable to practice essential skills like guiding across busy roads and on to trains and buses, owners may have to wait a little longer. /// End of part 2 /// "It will be challenging for the dogs, it will mean that when they do come back into training with us, and we are able to start training them again, it might just take that little bit longer," Amy said. "We will have to work quite hard to MAKE sure that the dogs are really confident before they are matched with a client." It is not just the guide dogs in the making being kept busy during lockdown - some old dogs are BEING taught new tricks by their owners. While visually impaired people may have to wait longer for their dogs, the efforts of the boarders were making a difference. "A significant number of people with sight LOSS live alone, and the current restrictions can leave them feeling cut OFF from their usual support networks of friends and family," she said. "Many are not online, so Guide Dogs staff are making regular phone calls to check on the well-being of every single service user, helping them TO ACCESS the practical support they need. "As an organisation, we are currently planning for such time as services can safely resume, and our plans are reviewed daily, based on the latest advice from the government." ///End of the Text ///

FINI J'ai trouvé ce texte bien long et j'ai dû le relire 15 fois sur plusieurs jours pour en venir à bout. Bon courage à tous
Je vous transférerai la traduction de la 1ere partie en temps voulu , elle est déjà bien avancée



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/70 de taiji43, postée le 20-05-2020 à 16:42:54 (S | E)
Dear Here4Un have a nice day!

Ten minutes to findout the most flagrant mistakes 👨‍🎓 and two to three hours spread over two days to find out the answers to my hesitations without being certain ...(of course!)

READY TO BE CORRECTED

Navigating busy roads, public transport and trips to the shops are all in a day's work for a guide dog.
But with most training centres closed and roads quite, there are concerns visually impaired people may have to wait longer to get a dog.

Volunteers, known as boarders, are instead using video lessons to keep training GOING around the house and garden during the coronavirus lockdown. Guide dog instructor Amy John said they were going "above and beyond". From when they start their training at about 12 months old, guide dogs live with their BOARDERS and are taken every day to a Guide Dogs training centre to learn essential skills.

But when social distancing measures came in, the training CENTRE (singulier) had to close, leaving it up to the volunteers to try to train the dogs from their living room (ROOMS and garden.GARDENS (un S avec their malgré que chacun a un seul living et un seul jardin)
"They can again go out for their daily walks, or for a free run, and that's BEEN invaluable for the moment," said Amy. With cafes and restaurants closed and less traffic on the roads, Amy said the PUPPIES ( pas kitten . Kitten sont des petits chats) have to face.
were not able to get used to many of the daily challenges FOR ????? guide dogs d(éfit pour les chiens guides)
"We take our dogs into shops and cafes, we use public transport regularly to get them used to be on buses, but at the moment all that is completely OVER she said. /// End of part 1 ///

Amy and her dog are making videos of exercises and then sending them to the boarders, who are practising them with the dogs and sending back footage for feedback. They may look like games, but the tricks teach essential skills, such as hand TOUCHING and putting their heads on seats, which are important to keep their OWNERS safely and provide reassurance.FOR THEM

"They're so used to GOING out and about while they are with us, so it's important to keep UP their little minds GOING " Amy said. Near the end of their training, which normally takes 16 weeks, the dogs are " MATCHED" with a visually impaired or blind owner, with factors like the dog's speed taken into account. But this has been paused until the lockdown ENDS (après until on met le présent) "It was real shame, we did have some dogs that were nearly at the end of their training and were ready to be matched," Amy said.

Actually there are visually impaired people on the waiting list for a guide dog. But even with the volunteers' efforts,
with dogs unable to practice essential skills like guiding across busy roads and on to ??????trains and buses, owners may have to wait a little longer. /// End of part 2 ///

"It will be challenging for the dogs, it will mean that when they do come back into training with us, and we are able to start training them again, it might just take A little bit longer," Amy "We will have to work quite hard to MAKE sure that the dogs are really confident before they are MATCHING with a client."

It is not just the guide dogs in the making being kept busy during lockdown - some old dogs are BEEING taught new tricks by their owners. While visually impaired people may have to wait longer for their dogs, the efforts FOR the boarders were making a difference.

"A significant number of people with sight LOSS (perte ici c'est le nom) live alone, and the current restrictions can leave them FEEL cut OFF from their usual support networks of friends and FAMILIES " she said. "Many are not online, so (Guide Dogs staff ) = STAFS OF GUIDE-DOGS are making regular phone calls to check on the well-being of EACH single service user, helping them TO ACCESS Or ACCESS( pas de ing après to help) the practical support they need. "As an organisation, we are currently planning for SUCH A time as services can safely resume, and our plans are reviewed daily, based on the latest advice from the government." ///End of the Text



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/70 de alpiem, postée le 20-05-2020 à 19:15:08 (S | E)
Rack your brains and help 70 OK FOR ASSESSMENT

PLEASE, HELP MY STUDENT... He has left 20 mistakes in this text… - some are recurring! (They should be corrected IN CAPITAL LETTERS, please!)

Cet exercice est un et la correction sera en ligne le mercredi 27 mai, tard. ENJOY!
Ce texte contient 20 fautes qu'il convient de corriger ...

Navigating busy roads, public transportS and trips to the shops are all in a day's work for a guide dog.

But with most training centres closed and roads quIET, there are concerns visually impaired people may have to wait longer to get a dog.
Volunteers, known as boarders, are instead using video lessons to keep training GOING around houseS and gardenS during the coronavirus lockdown.
Guide dog instructor Amy John said they were going "above and beyond". From when they start their training at about 12 months old, guide dogs live with their boarderS and are taken every day to a Guide Dogs training centre to learn essential skills.
But when social distancing measures came in, the training centres had to close, leaving it up to the volunteers to try TRAINING the dogs from their living roomS and gardenS.
"They can again go out for their daily walks, or for a free run, and that's being invaluable for the moment," said Amy. With cafes and restaurants closed and less traffic on roads, Amy said the PUPIES were not able to get used to many of the daily challenges guide dogs have to face .
"We take our dogs into shops and cafes, we use public transportS regularly to get them used to be on buses, but at the moment all that is completely out," she said. /// End of part 1 ///
Amy and her DOGS WILL VIEW videos of exercises and then SEND them to the boarders, who are practising them with the dogs and send back footage for feedback.
They may look like games, but the tricks teatch essential skills, such as hand TOUCHING and putting their heads on seats, which are important to keep their owner SAFE and provide reassurance. "
They're so used to go out and about while they are with us, so it's important to keep their little minds go," Amy said.
Near the end of their training, which normally takes 16 weeks, the dogs are "matching" with a visually impaired or blind owner, with factors like the dog's speed taken into account. But this has been paused until the lockdown HAS endED. "It was A real shame, we did have some dogs that were nearly at the end of their training and were ready to be matched," Amy said.
Actually there are visually impaired people on the waiting list for a guide dog. But even with the volunteers' efforts,
with dogs unable to practice essential skills like guiding across busy roads and on to trains and buses, owners may have to wait a little longer. /// End of part 2 ///
"It will be challenging for the dogs, it will mean that when they do come back into training with us, and we are able to start training them again, it might just take that little bit longer," Amy said.
"We will have to work quite hard to MAKE sure that the dogs are really confident before they are matched with a client."
It is not just the guide dogs in the making being kept busy during lockdown - some old dogs are been taught new tricks by their owners.
While visually impaired people may have to wait longer for their dogs, the efforts of the boarders were making a difference.
"A significant number of people with sight loose live alone, and the current restrictions can leave them feeling cut from their usual support networks of friends and family," she said. "
Many are not online, so Guide Dogs staff are making regular phone calls to check on the well-being of every single service user, helping them ACCESS the practical support they need.
"As an organisation, we are currently planning for such time WHEN services can safely resume, and our plans are reviewed daily, based on the latest advice from the government." ///End of the Text

-------------------
Modifié par alpiem le 20-05-2020 19:15



-------------------
Modifié par alpiem le 22-05-2020 10:57



-------------------
Modifié par alpiem le 22-05-2020 12:12





Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/70 de joe39, postée le 24-05-2020 à 11:22:47 (S | E)
Hello dear here4u,
After racking my brain, I send you my tentative to find out 20 mistakes, ready to be checked
20 mistakes.

Navigating busy roads, public transport and trips to the shops are all in a day's work for a guide dog.
But with most training centres closed and roads quite, there are concerns visually impaired people may have to wait longer to get a dog. Volunteers, known as boarders, are instead using video lessons to keep training GOING around the house and garden during the coronavirus lockdown.

Guide dog instructor Amy John said they were going "above and beyond". From when they start their training at about 12 months old, guide dogs live with their boarder and are taken every day to a Guide Dogs training centre to learn essential skills. But when social distancing measures came in, the training CENTRE had to close, leaving it up to the volunteers to try to train the dogs from their living ROOMS AND GARDENS.
"They can again go out for their daily walks, or for a free run, and that's being invaluable for the moment," said Amy.

With cafes and restaurants closed and less traffic on the roads, Amy said the PUPPIES were not able to get used to many of the daily challenges guide dogs have to face. "We take our dogs into shops and cafes, we use public transport regularly to get them used TO BEING on buses, but at the moment all that is completely OFF," she said. /// End of part 1 ///

Amy and her dog are making videos of exercises and then sending them to the boarders, who are practising them with the dogs and sending back footage for feedback. They may look like games, but the tricks teach essential skills, such as hand TOUCHING and putting their heads on seats, which are important to keep their owner SAFE and provide reassurance.

"They're so used TO GOING out and about while they are with us, so it's important to keep their little minds GOING," Amy said. Near the end of their training, which normally takes 16 weeks, the dogs are MATCHED
with a visually impaired or blind owner, with factors like the dog's speed taken into account. But this has been paused until the lockdown ENDS. "It was A real shame, we did have some dogs that were nearly at the end of their training and were ready to be matched," Amy said.

Actually there are visually impaired people on the waiting list for a guide dog. But even with the volunteers' efforts,
with dogs unable to practice essential skills like guiding across busy roads and on to trains and buses, owners may have to wait a little longer. /// End of part 2 /// "It will be challenging for the dogs, it will mean that when they do come back into training with us, and we are able to start training them again, it might just take that little bit longer," Amy said. "We will have to work quite hard ON to MAKE sure that the dogs are really confident before they are matched with a client." It is not just the guide dogs in the making being kept busy during lockdown - some old dogs are been taught new tricks by their owners.
While visually impaired people may have to wait longer for their dogs, the efforts of the boarders were making a difference. "A significant number of people with sight LOSS live alone, and the current restrictions can leave them feeling cut OFF from their usual support networks of friends and family," she said. "Many are not online, so Guide Dogs staff are making regular phone calls to check on the well-being of every single service user, helping them TO ACCESS the practical support they need. "As an ORGANIZATION, we are currently planning for such time as services can safely resume, and our plans are reviewed daily, based on the latest advice from the government." ///End of the Text ///

Many thanks for the demanding task, I hope you have a great week and a “softened” lockdown.

So long.
Joe39



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/70 de here4u, postée le 24-05-2020 à 11:42:10 (S | E)
Hello!

Encore quelques jours pour poster ! Je commence à envoyer vos corrections !



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/70 de here4u, postée le 27-05-2020 à 23:08:17 (S | E)
Hello, Dear Friends,

Vous avez grogné ... Le texte était difficile et les fautes "bien cachées" ... Sorry!
Il est vrai que certaines fautes ont été "oubliées" ...
N'oubliez pas de poser des questions si vous ne comprenez pas la correction ... Vos camarades y répondront, et je compléterai si nécessaire ...
L'épreuve de la traduction vous attend encore dans le "Follow Up Work"... Merci aux futures volontaires ... Prenez votre temps ... Il n'y a pas d'urgence pour les traductions ; il vous suffit de vous "déclarer volontaire" pour le travail restant, puis de le faire à votre rythme ...


Navigating busy roads, public transport and trips to the shops are all in a day's work for a guide dog.
But with most training centres closed and roads quiet,(1) there are concerns visually impaired people may have to wait longer to get a dog. Volunteers, known as boarders, are instead using video lessons to keep training going around (2) the house and garden during the coronavirus lockdown. From when they start their training at about 12 months old, guide dogs live with their boarder and are taken every day to a Guide Dogs training centre to learn essential skills. But when social distancing measures came in, the training centres had to close, leaving it up to the volunteers to try to train the dogs from their living rooms and gardens.(3)
"They can still (4) go out for their daily walks, or for a free run, and that's been (5) invaluable for the moment," said Amy. With cafes and restaurants closed and less traffic on the roads, Amy said the puppies(6) were not able to get used to many of the daily challenges guide dogs have to face. "We take our dogs into shops and cafes, we use public transport regularly to get them used to being (7) on buses, but at the moment all that is completely off,"(8) she said. /// End of part 1 /// Amy and her dog are making videos of exercises and then sending them to the boarders, who are practising them with the dogs and sending back footage for feedback. They may look like games, but the tricks teach essential skills, such as hand touching (9) and putting their heads on seats, which are important to keep their owner safe(10) and provide reassurance. "They're so used to going (7) out and about while they are with us, so it's important to keep their little minds going,"(11) Amy said. Near the end of their training, which normally takes 16 weeks, the dogs are "matched"(12) with a visually impaired or blind owner, with factors like the dog's speed taken into account. But this has been paused until the lockdown ends.(13) "It was a real shame(14), we did have some dogs that were nearly at the end of their training and were ready to be matched," Amy said.
Currently (15) there are visually impaired people on the waiting list for a guide dog. But even with the volunteers' efforts, with dogs unable to practice essential skills like guiding across busy roads and on to trains and buses, owners may have to wait a little longer. /// End of part 2 /// "It will be challenging for the dogs, it will mean that when they do come back into training with us, and we are able to start training them again, it might just take that little bit longer," Amy said. "We will have to work quite hard to make sure (16) that the dogs are really confident before they are matched with(12) a client." It is not just the guide dogs in the making being kept busy during lockdown - some old dogs are being taught (17) new tricks by their owners. While visually impaired people may have to wait longer for their dogs, the efforts of the boarders were making a difference. "A significant number of people with sight loss (18) live alone, and the current restrictions can leave them feeling cut off from (19) their usual support networks of friends and family," she said. "Many are not online, so Guide Dogs staff are making regular phone calls to check on the well-being of every single service user, helping them to access the practical support (20) they need. "As an organisation, we are currently planning for such time as services can safely resume, and our plans are reviewed daily, based on the latest advice from the government." ///End of the Text ///.

(1) Attention ! ne pas confondre QUIET= calme et QUITE= tout à fait.
(2) … to keep training going around the house= en + verbe ; to keep something going.
(3) their living rooms and gardens= pluriel concret. En tout il y a de nombreuses pièces et jardins.
(4) Soit "they can go out again" (à la rigueur), mais le sens du texte imposait «They can still go out»= ils peuvent encore sortir.
(5) that's been invaluable for the moment= that HAS BEEN invaluable for the moment.
(6) the puppies: il est question de jeunes chiens … pas de chats !
(7) They're so used to going out and about : to BE USED TO + ING ; Lien internet

(8) that is completely off= interrupted
(9) such as hand touching and putting...: respecter le parallélisme des deux constructions : touching// putting
(10) to keep their owner safe: un ADJECTIF (safe) était nécessaire ici, pas un ADVERBE (safely).
(11) to keep their little minds going: to keep + V + ing.
(12) the dogs are "matched" with a visually impaired or blind owner: to be "matched" (participe passé) pas "matching" (participe présent) car il s’agit d’une forme passive : auxiliaire être + participe passé.
(13) … paused until the lockdown ends. Encore une fois, pas de futur ni de conditionnel derrière UNTIL (conjonction de subordination temporelle), mais un présent (simple ou perfect) ou un prétérit.
(14) It was A real shame; what A shame/ it’s A shame.
(15) Ne pas confondre : Currently/ presently= now, nowadays et actually= en fait.
(16) … to make sure= s’assurer que.
(17) some old dogs are being taught new tricks by their owners : forme passive (auxiliaire du passif au présent en –ing) : to be + participe passé + compléments + complément d’agent (by …) Lien internet

(18) sight loss= loss of sight; to see, I saw, seen => the sight; to lose, I lost, lost=> le nom= loss
(19) to be cut off from= separated from
(20) helping them (to) access the practical support they need: to help someone DO something/ TO DO something. Pas de forme en ing derrière "to help".

Bravo pour vos TRÈS BONS TRAVAUX ! Vous avez fait de l'excellent travail ! à tous ...



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/70 de magie8, postée le 28-05-2020 à 13:18:52 (S | E)
BONJOUR ; jE VOUS ESPERE TOUS AVEC UN BON MORAL .Comme annoncé voici ma part de traduction

1ere partie
.


Navigating busy roads, public transport and trips to the shops are all in a day's work for a guide dog.
But with most training centres closed and roads quiet,(1) there are concerns visually impaired people may have to wait longer to get a dog. Volunteers, known as boarders, are instead using video lessons to keep training going around (2) the house and garden during the coronavirus lockdown. From when they start their training at about 12 months old, guide dogs live with their boarder and are taken every day to a Guide Dogs training centre to learn essential skills. But when social distancing measures came in, the training centres had to close, leaving it up to the volunteers to try to train the dogs from their living rooms and gardens.(3)
"They can still (4) go out for their daily walks, or for a free run, and that's been (5) invaluable for the moment," said Amy. With cafes and restaurants closed and less traffic on the roads, Amy said the puppies(6) were not able to get used to many of the daily challenges guide dogs have to face. "We take our dogs into shops and cafes, we use public transport regularly to get them used to being (7) on buses, but at the moment all that is completely off,"(8) she said. /// End of part 1 ///

Naviguer dans des rues très fréquentées,les transports en commun et les sorties dans les magasins font partie de la journée d'un chien guide
Mais avec la plupart des centres de formation fermés et des rues calmes,il y a des problèmes avec les personnes malvoyantes qui devront attendre plus longtemps pour obtenir un chien,les bénévoles ,connues sous le nom d'accueillants,se servent plutôt des leçons en vidéo pour continuer d'entraîner autour des maisons et des jardins pendant le confinement dû au coronavirus.L'instructeur de chiens-guides Amy John dit qu'ils allaient même" bien au delà".Dès l'âge de 12 mois, où ils commencent leur formation les chiens- guides vivent avec leurs accueillants et sont emmenés tous les jours dans un centre de formation pour acquérir les compétences essentielles. Mais lorsque les mesures de distanciation sociale sont arrivées ces centres ont dû fermer laissant le soin aux bénévoles d'essayer de former les chiens depuis leurs salons et leurs jardins.
Ils peuvent encore sortir pour leurs promenades quotidiennes ou pour une course en liberté et cela est inestimable pour le moment déclara Amy.Avec les cafés et restaurants fermés et moins de circulation sur les routes,Amy dit que les chiots n'étaient pas en mesure de s'habituer aux nombreux défis quotidiens auxquels les chiens-guides doivent faire face."Nous emmenons nos chiens dans les magasins et les bars,nous utilisons régulièrement les transports en commun pour les habituer aux bus mais pour le moment tout cela est absolument hors de question" expliqua-t-elle.

-------------------
Modifié par magie8 le 28-05-2020 19:50





Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/70 de maya92, postée le 28-05-2020 à 16:59:51 (S | E)
Hello Here4u,

Naviguer dans les rues encombrées, les transports publics ou faire un tour dans les magasins sont le travail quotidien d’un chien guide. Mais avec la fermeture de la plupart des centres d’entrainement ainsi que des routes, les personnes mal voyantes vont séans doute devoir attendre plus longtemps pour avoir un chien guide. Des volontaires que l’on appelle des accueillants utilisent des leçons en video pour continuer l’entrainement dans la maison et le jardin pendant le confinement dû au coronavirus. La monitrice d’entrainement des chiens-guide, Amy John dit qu’ils font plus que leur possible. Dès qu’ils commencent leur entrainement à l’âge d’un an environ, les chiens-guide vivent avec leur accueillant et sont conduits chaque jour dans un centre d’entrainement pour apprendre les techniques essentielles. Mais lorsque les mesures de distanciation ont été mises en oeuvre, les centres d’entrainement ont dû fermer laissant le soin aux volontaires d’essayer d’entrainer les chiens dans leurs salons ou dans leurs jardins. “Ils peuvent à nouveau faire leur promenade journalière ou courir et c’est précieux en ce moment” dit Amy. Avec la fermeture des cafés et des restaurants et moins de trafic sur les routes, Amy dit que les chiots ne peuvent pas s’adapter aux nombreux défis journaliers que les chiens-guide doivent affronter. “Nous amenons nos chiens dans les magasins et dans les cafés, nous utilisons régulièrement les transports publics pour les habituer à être dans les bus, mais en ce moment tout celà est totalement annulé” dit-elle

Amy, avec son chien, fait des videos des exercices et les envoie aux accueillants qui s’entrainent avec leur chien et font part de leurs réactions. Ca peut ressembler à un jeu mais ça leur apprend des techniques essentielles telles que toucher la main ou poser la tête sur un siège ce qui est important pour la sécurité de leur maître et pour qu’il se sente en sécurité. “Ils ont tellement l’habitude d’aller et venir quand ils sont avec nous qu’il est important de faire travailler leur jeune attention” dit Amy. Vers la fin de leur entrainement, qui dure environ 16 semaines, les chiens vont former une paire avec des personnes mal-voyantes ou aveugles, et des facteurs comme par exemple la rapidité du chien seront pris en considération. Mais tout ça a été mis en veille jusqu’à la fin du confinement. “C’est vraiment dommage, nous avions des chiens qui étaient presqu’à la fin de leur entrainement et qui étaient prêts à être associés” dit Amy. En fait il y a des personnes mal voyantes en liste d’attente pour avoir un chien-guide, mais même avec les efforts des volontaires et avec des chiens qui n’ont pas acquis les techniques nécessaires tel que guider quelqu’un dans les rues encombrées ou dans les trains ou dans les autobus, les propriétaires devront attendre un peu plus longtemps.

Ca va être un défi pour les chiens, ça veut dire que lorsqu’ils vont revenir s’exercer avec nous, et que nous pourrons les entrainer à nouveau, ce sera un peu plus long” dit Amy. Nous allons devoir travailler dur pour être sûrs qu’on peut vraiment faire confiance aux chiens avant de les confier à un client. Ca n’est pas seulement les chiens-guide en apprentissage qui doivent rester occupés pendant le confinement, leurs entraineurs ont appris de nouvelles ‘ficelles’ aux vieux chiens. Alors que les mal-voyants devront attendre leurs chiens un peu plus longtemps, les efforts des accueillants ont été très importants. Un grand nombre de personnes mal-voyantes vivent seules et les restrictions actuelles peuvent faire qu’ils se sentent coupés de leur réseau habituel de famille ou d’amis, dit-elle. Beaucoup n’ont pas d’Internet alors le personnel des chiens-guide leur téléphonent régulièrement pour vérifier qu’ils vont bien et pour les aider à accéder à l’aide dont ils ont besoin. En tant qu’organisation, nous nous préparons au moment où les services pourront reprendre et nos plans sont revus quotidiennement et basés sur les dernières prévisions du gouvernement

Thank u for this text -



Réponse : Rack your brains and help!/70 de here4u, postée le 30-05-2020 à 15:28:25 (S | E)
Hello, dearest Friends,

Voici la correction de votre FOLLOW up WORK... Pour la traduction, quelques mots "techniques" m'ont été soufflés par une amie qui travaille à la traduction des documents internationaux concernant l'éducation des "chiens-guides".(Il me manque encore une confirmation. )

Navigating busy roads, public transport and trips to the shops are all in a day's work for a guide dog.
But with most training centres closed and roads quiet, there are concerns visually impaired people may have to wait longer to get a dog. Volunteers, known as boarders, are instead using video lessons to keep training going around the house and garden during the coronavirus lockdown. From when they start their training at about 12 months old, guide dogs live with their boarder and are taken every day to a Guide Dogs training centre to learn essential skills. But when social distancing measures came in, the training centres had to close, leaving it up to the volunteers to try to train the dogs from their living rooms and gardens.
"They can still go out for their daily walks, or for a free run, and that's been invaluable for the moment," said Amy. With cafes and restaurants closed and less traffic on the roads, Amy said the puppies were not able to get used to many of the daily challenges guide dogs have to face. "We take our dogs into shops and cafes, we use public transport regularly to get them used to being on buses, but at the moment all that is completely off," she said.


Naviguer dans des rues très fréquentées et les transports en commun, les sorties dans les magasins font partie de la journée d'un chien guide.
Mais avec la plupart des centres de formation fermés et des rues calmes, il est probable que les personnes malvoyantes devront attendre plus longtemps pour obtenir un chien. Les bénévoles, connus sous le nom de « familles d’accueil », se servent plutôt de leçons en vidéo pour continuer les entraînements dans des maisons et les jardins pendant le confinement dû au coronavirus. Dès l'âge de 12 mois lorsqu' ils commencent leur formation, les chiens-guides vivent avec leurs "accueillants" et sont emmenés tous les jours dans un centre de formation pour acquérir les compétences essentielles. Mais lorsque les mesures de distanciation sociale sont arrivées, ces centres ont dû fermer laissant le soin aux bénévoles d'essayer de former les chiens depuis leurs salons et leurs jardins.
Ils peuvent encore sortir pour leurs promenades quotidiennes ou pour une course en liberté et cela est inestimable pour le moment déclara Amy. Avec les cafés et restaurants fermés et moins de circulation sur les routes, Amy dit que les chiots n'ont pas été en mesure de s'habituer aux nombreux défis quotidiens auxquels les chiens-guides doivent faire face. "Nous emmenons nos chiens dans les magasins et les bars, nous utilisons régulièrement les transports en commun pour les habituer aux bus mais pour le moment tout cela est absolument hors de question" expliqua-t-elle.
et Magie!


Naviguer dans les rues encombrées, les transports publics ou faire un tour dans les magasins sont le travail quotidien d’un chien guide. Mais avec la fermeture de la plupart des centres d’entrainement et des rues calmes, les personnes mal voyantes vont sans doute devoir attendre plus longtemps pour avoir un chien guide. Des volontaires que l’on appelle des « familles d’accueil » utilisent des leçons en vidéo pour continuer l’entrainement dans la maison et le jardin pendant le confinement dû au coronavirus. Dès qu’ils commencent leur entrainement à l’âge d’un an environ, les chiens-guide vivent avec leur « famille d'accueil » et sont conduits chaque jour dans un centre d’entrainement pour apprendre les techniques essentielles. Mais lorsque les mesures de distanciation ont été mises en oeuvre, les centres d’entrainement ont dû fermer laissant le soin aux volontaires d’essayer d’entraîner les chiens dans leurs salons et dans leurs jardins. “Ils peuvent à nouveau toujours faire leur promenade journalière ou courir et c’est précieux en ce moment” dit Amy. Avec la fermeture des cafés et des restaurants et moins de circulation sur les routes, Amy dit que les chiots n'ont pas pu s’adapter aux nombreux défis journaliers que les chiens-guide doivent affronter. “Nous amenons nos chiens dans les magasins et dans les cafés, nous utilisons régulièrement les transports publics pour les habituer à être dans les bus, mais en ce moment tout cela est totalement annulé.” dit-elle

et Maya!

Amy and her dog are making videos of exercises and then sending them to the boarders, who are practising them with the dogs and sending back footage for feedback. They may look like games, but the tricks teach essential skills, such as hand touching and putting their heads on seats, which are important to keep their owner safe and provide reassurance. "They're so used to going out and about while they are with us, so it's important to keep their little minds going," Amy said. Near the end of their training, which normally takes 16 weeks, the dogs are "matched" with a visually impaired or blind owner, with factors like the dog's speed taken into account. But this has been paused until the lockdown ends. "It was a real shame, we did have some dogs that were nearly at the end of their training and were ready to be matched," Amy said.
Currently there are visually impaired people on the waiting list for a guide dog. But even with the volunteers' efforts, with dogs unable to practice essential skills like guiding across busy roads and on to trains and buses, owners may have to wait a little longer.

Avec son chien, Amy fait des vidéos des exercices et les envoie aux "accueillants" qui s’entraînent avec leur chien et font part de leurs réactions. Ca peut ressembler à un jeu mais ça leur apprend des techniques essentielles telles que "toucher la main" ou "poser la tête sur un siège", ce qui est important pour la sécurité de leur maître et pour qu’il se sente en confiance. “Ils ont tellement l’habitude d’aller et venir quand ils sont avec nous qu’il est important de faire travailler leur jeune attention ...” dit Amy. Vers la fin de leur entrainement, qui dure environ 16 semaines, les chiens vont "être remis" (= formule officielle ! ) à des personnes mal-voyantes ou aveugles, et des facteurs comme par exemple la rapidité du chien seront pris en considération. Mais tout ça a été mis en veille jusqu’à la fin du confinement. “C’est vraiment dommage, nous avions des chiens qui étaient presqu’en fin d'entrainement et qui étaient prêts à être remis” dit Amy. En fait il y a des personnes mal voyantes en liste d’attente pour avoir un chien-guide, mais malgré les efforts des volontaires et comme les chiens n’ont pas acquis les techniques nécessaires tel que guider quelqu’un dans les rues encombrées, dans les trains ou dans les autobus, les propriétaires devront attendre un peu plus longtemps.
et Maya.

"It will be challenging for the dogs, it will mean that when they do come back into training with us, and we are able to start training them again, it might just take that little bit longer," Amy said. "We will have to work quite hard to make sure that the dogs are really confident before they are matched with a client." It is not just the guide dogs in the making being kept busy during lockdown - some old dogs are being taught new tricks by their owners. While visually impaired people may have to wait longer for their dogs, the efforts of the boarders were making a difference. "A significant number of people with sight loss live alone, and the current restrictions can leave them feeling cut off from their usual support networks of friends and family," she said. "Many are not online, so Guide Dogs staff are making regular phone calls to check on the well-being of every single service user, helping them to access the practical support they need. "As an organisation, we are currently planning for such time as services can safely resume, and our plans are reviewed daily, based on the latest advice from the government."

Cela va représenter un défi pour les chiens, signifiant que lorsqu’ils vont revenir s’exercer avec nous, et que nous pourrons les entraîner à nouveau, il se pourrait bien que ce soit un petit peu plus long” dit Amy. Nous allons devoir travailler dur pour être sûrs qu’on peut vraiment faire confiance aux chiens avant de les confier à un client. Ce ne sont pas seulement les chiens-guide en apprentissage qui doivent rester occupés pendant le confinement, leurs entraîneurs ont appris de nouvelles ‘ficelles’ aux vieux chiens. Alors que les mal-voyants devront attendre leurs chiens un peu plus longtemps, les efforts des "accueillants" ont été très importants. "Un grand nombre de personnes mal-voyantes vivent seules et les restrictions actuelles peuvent faire qu’ils se sentent coupés de leur réseau habituel de famille ou d’amis," dit-elle. "Beaucoup n’ont pas d’Internet alors le personnel des chiens-guide leur téléphonent régulièrement pour vérifier qu’ils vont bien et pour les aider à accéder à l’aide dont ils ont besoin." En tant qu’organisation, nous nous préparons au moment où les services pourront reprendre en toute sécurité et nos plans sont revus quotidiennement s'appuyant sur les dernières prévisions du gouvernement

et encore Maya (et Magie! ) pour ce très bon travail.

Un grand à tous, ... Happy Birthday, dear Lucile and best wishes for a fast recovery to our dear Choco!




[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum



Partager : Facebook / Twitter / ... 


> INDISPENSABLES : TESTEZ VOTRE NIVEAU | NOS MEILLEURES FICHES | Fiches les plus populaires | Aide/Contact

> COURS ET TESTS : Arithmétique | Avec cours | Calculs | Calculs littéraux | Conversions | Enfants | Equations | Fonctions | Fractions | Géométrie | Jeux | Nombres | Nombres relatifs | Opérations | Plusieurs thèmes | Problèmes | Statistiques | Tests de niveaux

> INFORMATIONS : - En savoir plus, Aide, Contactez-nous [Conditions d'utilisation] [Conseils de sécurité] Reproductions et traductions interdites sur tout support (voir conditions) | Contenu des sites déposé chaque semaine chez un huissier de justice. | Mentions légales / Vie privée / Cookies .
| Cours et exercices de mathématiques 100% gratuits, hors abonnement internet auprès d'un fournisseur d'accès.